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Red Hat has no plans to create a traditional Linux desktop software for the end user market, but will continue to place its bets on a desktop for commercial markets as it is not making money from them. From the press release:

An explanation: as a public, for-profit company, Red Hat must create products and technologies with an eye on the bottom line, and with desktops this is much harder to do than with servers. The desktop market suffers from having one dominant vendor, and some people still perceive that today’s Linux desktops simply don’t provide a practical alternative. Of course, a growing number of technically savvy users and companies have discovered that today’s Linux desktop is indeed a practical alternative. Nevertheless, building a sustainable business around the Linux desktop is tough, and history is littered with example efforts that have either failed outright, are stalled or are run as charities. But there’s good news too. Technical developments that have become available over the past year or two are accelerating the spread of the Linux Desktop.

Now I'm just wondering where this leaves Fedora Desktop in the long term? Ubuntu Linux seems to doing well and it is going to lead Linux Desktop market along with other distros. Linux is also getting installed on mobile and many tiny devices.

Time is Right For Linux Desktop PCs To Emerge

Linux is capable of running a big iron server, routers, tiny devices, supercomputers and ATMs. However the million dollar question can Linux finally crack Microsoft Corp.'s hold on computing's most visible domain -- mainstream PCs?

I think Linux has the ability and the rise of inexpensive machines such as Asus EEE Pc ($300 notebook PC) is fine proof of concept. Over last few years I had worked with government and private project involving Linux on desktop. Many Indian state and union (federal) government supports Linux as desktop operating system. Linux is perfect for

  • Browsing / Internet / Chatting / Email
  • Office Application
  • Programming / Database etc

My personal experience shows that Linux can cut cost by 40 to 50 percent over comparable Windows computer.

This Yahoo news article provides further insight into current Linux desktop scenario:

Of course, prognosticators perennially say Linux is on the verge. It gets high marks for security and stability and is widely used behind the scenes in corporate servers, making it a natural candidate to steal desktop thunder from Microsoft's dominant Windows. And yet Linux PCs still represent less than 2 percent of the market.

This time, though, there's actually evidence of momentum.

While the best features in the latest Windows release, Vista, require top-notch configurations that can quickly ramp up a PC's price, one of the hottest segments of the industry involves inexpensive computers.

What do you think? Is Linux ready for prime time?