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Nagios: System and Network Monitoring Book

Nagios is a popular open source computer system and network monitoring application software. You can easily monitor all your hosts, network equipment and services. It can send alert when things go wrong and again when they get better.

The convenience and reliability that monitoring programs offer system administrators is astounding. Whether at home, commuting, or on vacation, admins can continuously monitor their networks, learning of issues long before they become catastrophes.

Nagios, the most popular open source solution for system and network monitoring, is extremely robust, but it's also intensely complex. This eagerly anticipated revision of the highly acclaimed Nagios: System and Network Monitoring, has been updated to address Nagios 3.0 and will help readers take full advantage of the many powerful features of the new version. Ethan Galstad, the main developer of Nagios, called the first edition of Nagios "incredibly detailed." He went on to say, "I don't think I could have gone into that much detail if I wrote a book myself."

Nagios, which runs on Linux and most *nix variants, can be configured to continuously monitor network services such as SMTP, POP3, HTTP, NNTP, SSH, and FTP. It can also supervise host resources (processor load, disk and memory usage, running processes, log files, and so on) and environmental factors, such as temperature and humidity. Readers of Nagios learn how to:

  • Install and configure the Nagios core, all standard plugins, and selected third-party plugins
  • Configure the notification system
  • Program event handlers to take automatic action when trouble occurs
  • Write Perl plugins to customize Nagios for unique system needs
  • Quickly understand Nagios data using graphing and visualization tools
  • Monitor Windows servers, SAP systems, and databases

This dense, all-inclusive guide to Nagios also contains a chapter that highlights the differences between Nagios versions 2 and 3 and gives practical migration and compatibility tips. Nagios, 2nd Edition is a key resource for any system and network administrator and will ease the pain of network monitoring migraines in no time.

Wolfgang Barth has written several books for professional network administrators, including The Firewall Book (Suse Press), Network Analysis (Suse Press), and Backup Solutions with Linux (Open Source Press). He is a professional system administrator with considerable experience using Nagios.

Book Info

  • Title: Nagios: System and Network Monitoring, 2nd Edition
  • Author: Wolfgang Barth
  • Pub Date: October 2008, 720 pp
  • ISBN 9781593271794, $59.95 USD
  • Download free chapter 18: "NagVis" (PDF)
  • Order info: order@oreilly.com // 1-800-998-9938 // 1-707-827-7000
  • Support nixCraft: Order Nagios: System and Network Monitoring from Amazon.

Red Hat paid approximately $107 million in cash for Qumranet, a privately held company. Now, Red Hat positioned to deliver comprehensive, reliable and open virtualization to Linux and Windows servers and desktops.

Red Hat today announced the acquisition of Qumranet, Inc. The acquisition includes Qumranet's virtualization solutions, including its KVM (Kernel Virtual Machine) platform and SolidICE offering, a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI), which together present a comprehensive virtualization platform for enterprise customers. In addition, in connection with the deal, Qumranet's talented team of professionals that develop, test and support Qumranet solutions, and its leaders of the open source community KVM project, will join Red Hat.

According wikipedia:

Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is a Linux kernel virtualization infrastructure. KVM currently supports native virtualization using Intel VT or AMD-V. A wide variety of guest operating systems work with KVM, including many flavours of Linux, BSD, Solaris, Windows, Haiku, ReactOS and AROS Research Operating System.

Red Hat Advances Virtualization Leadership with Qumranet, Inc. Acquisition

Windows PowerShell vs UNIX BASH Shell

Shell scripting is fun. It is useful to create nice (perhaps ugly) things (read as solutions) in shell scripting. Now Windows got Powershell. But how does PowerShell measure up to traditional shells like Bash?

Linux Magazine's Marcus Nasarek compares Windows Vista PowerShell with Bash:

Both Bash and the Windows Vista PowerShell include commands for navigating directories, managing files, and launching other programs. System administration is an important duty for the shell, and Bash and PowerShell are equipped to help manage systems from the command prompt. Whereas Bash typically relies on a combination of newer tools and classic Unix utilities, the PowerShell has its own set of command-line programs. Windows refers to PowerShell commands as cmdlets. The PowerShell cmdlet called Get-Process is a counterpart to ps, and the cmdlet Get-Content corresponds to less. PowerShell differs significantly from previous Windows command shells.

Some time I need to work with on Windows Servers and I find this article interesting. However, I prefer to use Perl or Python for complicated stuff.

I am responsible for couple of MS-Windows servers and Windows XP/Vista/7 workstations too. When I work from home, I need a way to get into Windows XP/2000/Vista/2003/2008/7/Vista operating systems for work.
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