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HowTo: Use OpenBSD In the Corporate Environment

OpenBSD has a reputation for high security and difficult operating systems for new user. But, some orginsations are using OpenBSD for everything including firewall, servers and desktop computers. This is quite impressive, from the article:

So our paid job is hacking on and deploying, maintaining, supporting... OpenBSD installations. We are also required to hack on things that can be merged back into OpenBSD itself and when it's not possible, then we change what we did so that it can be. Of course some developments are very specific to what we do and have no place in the project's CVS tree.

So, amongst other services, we set up and maintain several 100% OpenBSD-based infrastructures (going from the entry site firewall to the secretary's workstation) and this is what I'm going to talk about here.

As a side note, it is important to know that we are working exclusively for Fortune 500 companies (each operating in totally different and unrelated sectors).

Read more: A Puffy in the corporate aquarium.

How To Convert From a VMware Image To Virtualbox Image

VirtualBox is a virtual emulator like VMWare workstation. It has many of the features VMWare has, as well as some of its own.

I really like new Opensource VirtualBox from Sun. It is light on resources. Here is a quick tip - you can convert a VMware virtual machine to a VirtualBox machine using qemu-img utility.
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What you should (and shouldn’t) expect from 64-bit Linux?

Update: Many issues mentioned in linked articles are no longer true. This post was originally written way back in 2006.

Nathan Willis has some good information on this topic.

From the article:

So you just bought and assembled a brand-new AMD64 workstation. The only decision that remains is whether to install a 64-bit Linux distribution, or stick with comfortable, tried-and-true IA-32. If you are seeking an easy answer to that question, I can't help you. Running 64-bit Linux has its pros and cons. Unfortunately, a lot of the cons are out of your hands -- but they're not really Linux's fault, either.

For starters, you should know that there are essentially no proprietary applications for a 64-bit Linux desktop. Google, Adobe, iD, Skype, and the rest of the independent software vendors (ISV) who release Linux binaries of their apps by and large do so solely for 32-bit Intel architecture only.

Read more at Linux.com...