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OpenSolaris UNIX OS Officially Launched

OpenSolaris AKA project Indiana is here. Sun and the OpenSolaris community launched the official first version of the open-source OpenSolaris operating system, which has only been available in pre-release versions for developers until now. New operating system includes:

=> Single CD installation (like many Linux distros)

=> New installer and package manager

=> DTrace, Containers, ZFS and other technologies

Amazon is offering selected developers the ability to run OpenSolaris applications on its EC2 "cloud computing" servers. Participation for now is by invitation only - the service has a beta tag while the company learns how to scale up.

Companies with OpenSolaris packages available for EC2 from Monday include Gigaspaces and Zamanda, with Sun also providing Glassfish and Ruby on Rails packages.

OpenSolaris upgrades are to be released every six months.

Download OpenSolaris

The Live CD makes it simple to boot to a fully functional desktop environment, including Firefox and Thunderbird. Try it without fear -- our instant rollback feature works like a giant undo button, so your system is always protected, and you'll never lose work. And, you can load OpenSolaris 2008.05 easily in a variety of virtualization technologies including the open source VirtualBox hypervisor:

This is a great way to build UNIX based NAS server with all goodness of ZFS.

Sun recently announced the addition of powerful developer tools and expanded professional service capabilities to help developers better leverage the growing open source communities that are fast changing the economics of the storage IT landscape. Over 3,000 members and 30+ projects within an active and growing OpenSolaris storage community demonstrate a groundswell within the storage industry for developers and enterprise companies to use open source alternatives to expensive proprietary storage offerings.

Sun further claimed that average developer will be able to set up an OpenSolaris server is about 10 minutes. You can build a OpenSolaris operating system storage server in 10 minutes or less. This how-to recipe is intended to familiarize developers with the simple commands in Solaris for performing data management tasks, i.e. ZFS, NFS, CIFS, COMSTAR etc.

Setting Up an OpenSolaris Storage Server in 10 Minutes or Less

Setting Up an OpenSolaris NAS Box: Father-Son Bonding

Now, the million dollar question - will free software able to sell Sun hardware?

Download of the day: FreeBSD 7.0 ISO / CD Image

FreeBSD 7.0 stable has been released and available for download. FreeBSD is back to its incredible performance. According to some benchmarks on both Intel and AMD 64 bit systems FreeBSD 7.0 being faster than Linux 2.6 when running PostreSQL or MySQL. It has experimental support for Sun's ZFS filesystem. gjournal can be used to set up journaled filesystems, gvirstor can be used as a virtualized storage provider. Please see complete release note including upgrade instructions here. There is also interview published with FreeBSD developers

Download FreeBSD 7.0

You can download FreeBSD 7.0 ISO file from FTP server

You can also use Bittorent to grab FreeBSD 7.0 ISO files

This is an interesting filesystem comparison. If you are looking to build cheap storage for personal use file system decision is quite important:

This is my attempt to cut through the hype and uncertainty to find a storage subsystem that works. I compared XFS and EXT4 under Linux with ZFS under OpenSolaris. Aside from the different kernels and filesystems, I tested internal and external journal devices and software and hardware RAIDs. Software RAIDs are "raid-10 near2" with 6 disks on Linux. On Solaris the zpool is created with three mirrors of two disks each. Hardware RAIDs use the Areca's RAID-10 for both Linux and Solaris. Drive caches are disabled throughout, but the battery-backed cache on the controller is enabled when using hardware RAID.

=> ZFS, XFS, and EXT4 filesystems compared

I’ve already written about MySQL backup using a shell script and consistent backup with Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM) snapshots:

A snapshot volume is a special type of volume that presents all the data that was in the volume at the time the snapshot was created. This means you can back up that volume without having to worry about data being changed while the backup is going on, and you don’t have to take the database volume offline while the backup is taking place.

Niclas has posted a nice howto about consistent MySQL backups using Solaris UNIX ZFS snapshots:

In this article I will show you how to install MySQL on a ZFS file system and supply you with a script to make consistent snapshots of the databases. This script may not be 100% fit for busy sites but for most smaller places I think it is perfect.

ZFS on Linux using FUSE

Linus Torvalds called ZFS one of the very few bright spots in Solaris. ZFS released under Sun's Common Development and Distribution License. Linux is under GPL v2 which makes ZFS incompatible with Linux. I’ve used ZFS under Solaris and it is absolutely rocking file system.

Now this hot feature from OpenSolaris is taking a weird but working path to Linux inclusion using FUSE (Filesystem in Userspace).

If you like Linux for the long list of supported hardware but Solaris for the advanced new ZFS filesystem, a new development project might have a happy surprise for you. One advantage to putting ZFS into a separate daemon is the same as something that microkernel operating system developers have been talking up for years: You can kill and restart the filesystem independently of the operating system.

Check out official ZFS on FUSE blog and LinuxWorld article for more information ZFS on Linux: It's alive