Amazon Web Services ( AWS)

News, tutorials, and how-tos about Amazon Web Services ( AWS) cloud computing platform. Includes tutorials about EC2 CloudFront content delivery network (CDN), route 53 – dns service and much more ( rss feed ).

You can send visitors to different servers based on country of their IP address using Amazon Route 53 cloud based dns server. For example, if you have a server in Amsterdam, a server in America, and a server in Singapore, then you can easily route traffic for visitors in Europe to the Amsterdam server, people in Asia go to the Singapore server and those in the rest of the world be served by the American server. This will results into the various kinds of benefits such as:

  1. Better performance as you are sending web site visitors to their nearest web server.
  2. Reduced load on origin.
  3. Geomarketing/online advertising.
  4. Restricting content to those geolocated in specific countries (I am not a big fan of DRM).
  5. In some cases you can get potentially lower costs and more.

In this post, I will explain how to configure and test GeoDNS using AWS Route 53 service.

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A typical Wordpress blog contains a mix of static stuff such as images, javascript, style sheets and dynamic content such as posts, pages and comments posted by users. You can speed up your blog by serving static content via content delivery network such as Akamai, Edgecast and so on. The big boys of CDN business also offered the solution to accelerate dynamic content to improve the performance and reliability of the blog. However, solutions offered by big and traditional CDNs are expensive. Amazon cloudfront recently started to serving dynamic content at lowered price. In this blog post, I will explain:

  1. How to serve your entire blog using cloudfront.
  2. DNS settings.
  3. Wordpress settings.
  4. Documenting limitations of cloudfront.
  5. Documenting performance improvements.

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Amazon web services (AWS) launched a new service called Amazon Glacier. You can use this service for archiving mission-critical data and backups in a reliable way in an enterprise IT or for personal usage. This service cost as low as $0.01 (one US penny, one one-hundredth of a dollar) per Gigabyte, per month. You can store a lot of data in various geographically distinct facilities and verifying hardware or data integrity, irrespective of the length of your retention periods. The first thing comes to mind is, the Glacier would be a good place for a backup off family photos and videos from my local 12TB nas.

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Excellent news. This may come handy. In our data center we have a few servers for just two applications. These applications are just run for 2 or 3 days a month and then the rest of the time all servers in rack just sit idle. It is a waste of servers, time, energy and resources. This is a good use-cases for on-demand high I/O server(s), where I need low-latency and are an exceptionally good host for NoSQL databases such as MongoDB.

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