Explain Virtual File System

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Virtual file system (VFS) or Virtual filesystem switch is an abstraction layer on top of a more concrete file system. The purpose of a VFS is to allow for client applications to access different types of concrete file systems in a uniform way. A VFS can for example be used to access local and network storage devices transparently without the client application noticing the difference. Or it can be used to bridge the differences in Windows, Mac OS and Unix filesystems, so that applications could access files on local file systems of those types without having to know what type of file system they’re accessing.

More info about VFS:

Under Linux you can create a Virtual File System as follows
Use dd command to create a VFS disk image (5 MB):
$ dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/vfs-disk count=10240
Format your disk image with mkfs.ext3 command:
$ mkfs.ext3 /tmp/vfs-disk
When prompted for confirmation type ‘y’ to format VFS disk image.

Mounting VFS with a loopback device:
# mkdir -p /mnt/vfs0
# mount -o loop=/dev/loop0 /tmp/vfs-disk /mnt/vfs0

It will act as a normal file system. You can take this image to other computer and mount it.

Linux burn ISO images to Cds and CD-RWs howto

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Linux comes with various GUI and command line application to burn ISO images to CDs/CD-RWs. Cdrecord is command line based application used to record data or audio Compact Discs on an Orange Book CD-Recorder or to write DVD media on a DVD-Recorder i.e. it can brun ISO images.

Find out your CDR/W SCSI address/device name

Scan all SCSI devices on all SCSI busses and print the inquiry strings with –scanbus option. This option may be used to find SCSI address of the CD/DVD-Recorder on a system:
# cdrecord -scanbus
Output:

Cdrecord-Clone 2.01a34 (i686-pc-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 1995-2004 Jrg Schilling
scsidev: 'ATA:'
devname: 'ATA'
scsibus: -1 target: -1 lun: -1
Warning: Using badly designed ATAPI via /dev/hd*
interface.
Linux sg driver version: 3.5.27
Using libscg version 'schily-0.8'.
scsibus1:
1,0,0 100) 'SONY' 'CD-Writer' '1.0g'
1,1,0 101) *
1,2,0 102) *
1,3,0 103) *
1,4,0 104) *
1,5,0 105) *
1,6,0 106) *
1.7.0 107) *

In above example, my device name is 1,0,0. Now again use the cdrecord command to burn ISO image:
# cdrecord -v -dao dev=1,0,0 file.iso
You can also specify burning speed:
# cdrecord -v -dao dev=1,0,0 speed=8 file.iso

See also:

How Linux file permissions work

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Linux (and almost all other Unixish systems) have three user classes as follows:

  • User (u): The owner of file
  • Group (g): Other user who are in group (to access files)
  • Other (o): Everyone else

You can setup following mode on each files. In a Linux and UNIX set of permissions is called as mode:

  • Read (r)
  • Write (w)
  • Execute (x)

However, above three modes or permission have different meaning for file and directory:

Linux Read mode permissions

  • Read access on a file allows you to view file
  • Read access on a directory allows you to view directory contents with ls command

Write mode permissions

  • Write access on a file allows you to write to file
  • Write access on a directory allows you to remove or add new files

Execute mode permissions

  • Execute access on a file allows to run program or script
  • Execute access on a directory allows you access file in the directory

Octal numbers and permissions

You can use octal number to represent mode/permission:

  • r: 4
  • w: 2
  • x: 1

For example, for file owner you can use octal mode as follows. Read, write and execute (full) permission on a file in octal is
0+r+w+x = 0+4+2+1 = 7

Only Read and write permission on a file in octal is
0+r+w+x = 0+4+2+0 = 6

Only read and execute permission on a file in octal is
0+r+w+x = 0+4+0+1 = 5

Use above method to calculate permission for group and others. Let us say you wish to give full permission to owner, read & execute permission to group, and read only permission to others, then you need to calculate permission as follows:
User = r+w+x = 0+4+2+1 = 7
Group= r+w+x = 0+4+2+0 = 6
Others = r+w+x = 0+0+0+1 = 1

Effective permission is 761.

chmod command

To setup file permission you need to use chmod command:
chmod {mode} {file-name}

To setup file permission 761 you need to use chmod command as follows:
# chmod 0761 file
To setup a file readable by anyone and writable by the owner only:
# chmod 644 file
To setup a file readable/executable by everyone and writable by the owner only:
# chmod 755 file
You can change permissions for all files and directories within a directory by using the -R option on the chmod command. For example, to setup others read and execute access to all files and directories (and files and directories within directories), you need to type command as follows (i.e. change the modes of the file hierarchies rooted in the files instead of just the files themselves):
# chmod -R 755 directory-name/

Further readings

  1. Access rights: Linux’s first line of defense
  2. Read chmod command man page for more information.