Fedora Linux reconfigure X server

in Categories , , , , last updated May 27, 2007

Q. I messed up with my X server configuration. Now I would like to reconfigure X server.

A. Fedora comes with the X Configuration Tool called redhat-config-xfree86 which provides a graphical interface for creating, modifying or reconfiguring the XFree86 configuration file.

At shell prompt type following command to reconfigure X server under Fedora Linux (login as the root user):
# redhat-config-xfree86

You can pass –reconfig option and –noui option if want to disregard any configurations on existing XFree86 configuration files. This is useful when your system is with no prior X configuration:
# redhat-config-xfree86 --reconfig --noui

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Linux display information about installed hardware

in Categories , , , , , last updated January 26, 2008

You need to use command called lsdev. It gathers information about your computer’s installed hardware from the interrupts, ioports and dma files in the /proc directory, thus giving you a quick overview of which hardware uses what I/O addresses and what IRQ and DMA channels.

This command is very useful while troubleshooting various hardware conflict problems.

Task display : CPU Information

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo

Task: Display Free and used Memory Information

$ free -m

Task: Display partition information

# fdisk -l

Task: Display file system disk space usage

# df -H
OR
# df -h

Task: Estimate file space usage

# du

Task: List PCI devices

# lspci

Task: List USB devices

# lsusb

Task display : More Information

$ lsdev

Output:

Device            DMA   IRQ  I/O Ports
------------------------------------------------
0000:00:1d.0                 d800-d81f
0000:00:1d.1                 d000-d01f
0000:00:1d.2                 d400-d41f
0000:00:1f.0                 4000-407f 4080-40bf
0000:00:1f.1                 f000-f00f
0000:00:1f.3                 5000-501f
0000:00:1f.5                 e000-e0ff e400-e43f
0000:01:05.0                   c000-c0ff
8139too                          c000-c0ff
acpi                      9
bttv0                    22
cascade             4
dma                          0080-008f
dma1                         0000-001f
dma2                         00c0-00df
ehci_hcd:usb4            20
eth0                     18
fpu                          00f0-00ff
GPE0_BLK                       4028-402f
i8042                  1 12
ICH4                     21
ide0                     14  01f0-01f7 03f6-03f6   f000-f007
ide1                     15  0170-0177 0376-0376   f008-f00f
Intel                          e000-e0ff   e400-e43f
keyboard                     0060-006f
parport0                  7  0378-037a
PCI                          0cf8-0cff c000-cfff
pic1                         0020-0021
pic2                         00a0-00a1
PM1a_CNT_BLK                   4004-4005
PM1a_EVT_BLK                   4000-4003
PM_TMR                         4008-400b
rtc                       8  0070-0077
serial                       02f8-02ff 03f8-03ff
timer                     0
timer0                       0040-0043
timer1                       0050-0053
uhci_hcd                       d000-d01f   d400-d41f   d800-d81f
uhci_hcd:usb1            16
uhci_hcd:usb2            19
uhci_hcd:usb3            17
vga+                         03c0-03df

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Linux burn ISO images to Cds and CD-RWs howto

in Categories , , , , , , , , last updated December 20, 2007

Linux comes with various GUI and command line application to burn ISO images to CDs/CD-RWs. Cdrecord is command line based application used to record data or audio Compact Discs on an Orange Book CD-Recorder or to write DVD media on a DVD-Recorder i.e. it can brun ISO images.

Find out your CDR/W SCSI address/device name

Scan all SCSI devices on all SCSI busses and print the inquiry strings with –scanbus option. This option may be used to find SCSI address of the CD/DVD-Recorder on a system:
# cdrecord -scanbus
Output:

Cdrecord-Clone 2.01a34 (i686-pc-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 1995-2004 Jrg Schilling
scsidev: 'ATA:'
devname: 'ATA'
scsibus: -1 target: -1 lun: -1
Warning: Using badly designed ATAPI via /dev/hd*
interface.
Linux sg driver version: 3.5.27
Using libscg version 'schily-0.8'.
scsibus1:
1,0,0 100) 'SONY' 'CD-Writer' '1.0g'
1,1,0 101) *
1,2,0 102) *
1,3,0 103) *
1,4,0 104) *
1,5,0 105) *
1,6,0 106) *
1.7.0 107) *

In above example, my device name is 1,0,0. Now again use the cdrecord command to burn ISO image:
# cdrecord -v -dao dev=1,0,0 file.iso
You can also specify burning speed:
# cdrecord -v -dao dev=1,0,0 speed=8 file.iso

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