Fedora Linux reconfigure X server

Posted on in Categories , , , , last updated May 27, 2007

Q. I messed up with my X server configuration. Now I would like to reconfigure X server.

A. Fedora comes with the X Configuration Tool called redhat-config-xfree86 which provides a graphical interface for creating, modifying or reconfiguring the XFree86 configuration file.

At shell prompt type following command to reconfigure X server under Fedora Linux (login as the root user):
# redhat-config-xfree86

You can pass –reconfig option and –noui option if want to disregard any configurations on existing XFree86 configuration files. This is useful when your system is with no prior X configuration:
# redhat-config-xfree86 --reconfig --noui

See also:

Linux display information about installed hardware

Posted on in Categories , , , , , last updated January 26, 2008

You need to use command called lsdev. It gathers information about your computer’s installed hardware from the interrupts, ioports and dma files in the /proc directory, thus giving you a quick overview of which hardware uses what I/O addresses and what IRQ and DMA channels.

This command is very useful while troubleshooting various hardware conflict problems.

Task display : CPU Information

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo

Task: Display Free and used Memory Information

$ free -m

Task: Display partition information

# fdisk -l

Task: Display file system disk space usage

# df -H
OR
# df -h

Task: Estimate file space usage

# du

Task: List PCI devices

# lspci

Task: List USB devices

# lsusb

Task display : More Information

$ lsdev

Output:

Device            DMA   IRQ  I/O Ports
------------------------------------------------
0000:00:1d.0                 d800-d81f
0000:00:1d.1                 d000-d01f
0000:00:1d.2                 d400-d41f
0000:00:1f.0                 4000-407f 4080-40bf
0000:00:1f.1                 f000-f00f
0000:00:1f.3                 5000-501f
0000:00:1f.5                 e000-e0ff e400-e43f
0000:01:05.0                   c000-c0ff
8139too                          c000-c0ff
acpi                      9
bttv0                    22
cascade             4
dma                          0080-008f
dma1                         0000-001f
dma2                         00c0-00df
ehci_hcd:usb4            20
eth0                     18
fpu                          00f0-00ff
GPE0_BLK                       4028-402f
i8042                  1 12
ICH4                     21
ide0                     14  01f0-01f7 03f6-03f6   f000-f007
ide1                     15  0170-0177 0376-0376   f008-f00f
Intel                          e000-e0ff   e400-e43f
keyboard                     0060-006f
parport0                  7  0378-037a
PCI                          0cf8-0cff c000-cfff
pic1                         0020-0021
pic2                         00a0-00a1
PM1a_CNT_BLK                   4004-4005
PM1a_EVT_BLK                   4000-4003
PM_TMR                         4008-400b
rtc                       8  0070-0077
serial                       02f8-02ff 03f8-03ff
timer                     0
timer0                       0040-0043
timer1                       0050-0053
uhci_hcd                       d000-d01f   d400-d41f   d800-d81f
uhci_hcd:usb1            16
uhci_hcd:usb2            19
uhci_hcd:usb3            17
vga+                         03c0-03df

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Linux burn ISO images to Cds and CD-RWs howto

Posted on in Categories , , , , , , , , last updated December 20, 2007

Linux comes with various GUI and command line application to burn ISO images to CDs/CD-RWs. Cdrecord is command line based application used to record data or audio Compact Discs on an Orange Book CD-Recorder or to write DVD media on a DVD-Recorder i.e. it can brun ISO images.

Find out your CDR/W SCSI address/device name

Scan all SCSI devices on all SCSI busses and print the inquiry strings with –scanbus option. This option may be used to find SCSI address of the CD/DVD-Recorder on a system:
# cdrecord -scanbus
Output:

Cdrecord-Clone 2.01a34 (i686-pc-linux-gnu)
Copyright (C) 1995-2004 Jrg Schilling
scsidev: 'ATA:'
devname: 'ATA'
scsibus: -1 target: -1 lun: -1
Warning: Using badly designed ATAPI via /dev/hd*
interface.
Linux sg driver version: 3.5.27
Using libscg version 'schily-0.8'.
scsibus1:
1,0,0 100) 'SONY' 'CD-Writer' '1.0g'
1,1,0 101) *
1,2,0 102) *
1,3,0 103) *
1,4,0 104) *
1,5,0 105) *
1,6,0 106) *
1.7.0 107) *

In above example, my device name is 1,0,0. Now again use the cdrecord command to burn ISO image:
# cdrecord -v -dao dev=1,0,0 file.iso
You can also specify burning speed:
# cdrecord -v -dao dev=1,0,0 speed=8 file.iso

See also:

FreeBSD Hardware compatibility List (HCL)

Posted on in Categories , last updated November 29, 2007

Q. Can you list or tell the location of FreeBSD hardware compatibility list?

A. If you are not able to find out HCL then it is available online. Here are direct links to FreeBSD Hardware compatibility List html document. FreeBSD 6.0 Hardware compatibility List (HCL), it include following topics

  • Disk Controllers
  • Ethernet Interfaces
  • Token Ring Interfaces
  • FDDI Interfaces
  • ATM Interfaces
  • Wireless Network Interfaces
  • Miscellaneous Networks
  • ISDN Interfaces
  • Serial Interfaces
  • Sound Devices
  • Camera and Video Capture Devices
  • USB Devices
  • IEEE 1394 (Firewire) Devices
  • Bluetooth Devices
  • Cryptographic Accelerators
  • Miscellaneous
  • Visit online

Also general discussion about the types of hardware that FreeBSD runs on, various problems and suggestions concerning what to buy or avoid: http://lists.freebsd.org/mailman/listinfo/freebsd-hardware