Linux NFS Mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on fs2:/data3 Error And Solution

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I‘ve netapp NFS server with /data3 as shared directory. I type the following command at Ubuntu Linux to mount the NFS server:

mount fs2:/data3 /nfs/
OR
mount 192.168.1.100:/data3 /nfs/

But I’m getting an error which read as follows:

mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on fs2:/data3,
missing codepage or helper program, or other error
(for several filesystems (e.g. nfs, cifs) you might
need a /sbin/mount. helper program)
In some cases useful info is found in syslog – try
dmesg | tail or so

How do I fix this problem?

NFS client needs portmap service, simply install nfs-comman package as follows to fix this problem:
$ sudo apt-get install nfs-common
Make sure portmap service is running:
sudo service portmap status
Sample outputs:
portmap start/running, process 4193
If not just start it:
$ sudo service portmap start
One installed you can see all shared NFS directories as follows:
showmount -e fs2
Sample outputs:

Export list for fs2:
/Sales                 
/Web                    
/Accounting                    
/Recordings             
/Public                 
/Network Recycle Bin 1  
/Music             
/Download               
/Games
/Family

Simply run mount command again:
$ sudo mkdir /nfs
$ sudo mount fs2:/data3 /nfs/
$ ls /nfs

See also:

This entry is 13 of 15 in the Linux / UNIX NFS File Server Tutorial series. Keep reading the rest of the series:
  1. CentOS / Redhat: Setup NFS v4.0 File Server
  2. Debian / Ubuntu Linux: Setup NFSv4 File Server
  3. Mac Os X: Mount NFS Share / Set an NFS Client
  4. RHEL: How Do I Start and Stop NFS Service?
  5. How To Restart Linux NFS Server Properly When Network Become Unavailable
  6. Linux Iptables Allow NFS Clients to Access the NFS Server
  7. Debian / Ubuntu Linux Disable / Remove All NFS Services
  8. Linux: Tune NFS Performance
  9. Mount NFS file system over a slow and busy network
  10. Linux Track NFS Directory / Disk I/O Stats
  11. Linux Disable / Remove All NFS Services
  12. Linux: NFS4 mount Error reason given by server: No such file or directory
  13. Linux NFS Mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on fs2:/data3 Error And Solution
  14. CentOS / RHEL CacheFS: Speed Up Network File System (NFS) File Access
  15. Increase NFS Client Mount Point Security

7 comment

  1. You should also make sure that the portmapper service is actually running properly and listening to its assigned port. (described previously by Vivek). Here is the command:
    #netstat -an | grep LISTEN
    In the output of the command you should look for the port 111, which is the default port of portmapper (a.k.a. rpc.bind). This port makes sure that services that run on Linux can communicate with one another using pre-defined ports (for example you contact your filer from your machine using the port 2049, which is the default NFS port).

    Also, make sure that the important daemons that ensure a successful NFS connection (mountd, nfsd, nlockm) are also active. You can do that with the command:
    #/etc/init.d/nfs status (it’s true, this is for RedHat-based distros, I’m not very Debian-oriented…). If they are not running execute an /etc/init.d/nfs start

    Also, on your server-side (you filer) you should verify the integrity of the disks connected to your client-machine, using the disk scrubbing options offered by NetApp (disk scrub start)

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