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Solaris Buffer Overflow Protection

One of the most common ways for hackers to break into a Solaris system is to exploit buffer overflows. How do I turn on buffer overflow protection under Solaris UNIX operating system just like CentOS/Redhat Linux system?

Sun Solaris UNIX kernel provide protection against buffer overflows. It can detect, log, and prevent such attempts to execute code on the stack. You need update the /etc/system file, which provides a static mechanism for adjusting the values of kernel parameters. Values specified in this file are read at boot time and are applied. Any changes that are made to the file are not applied to the operating system until the system is rebooted.

Open /etc/system file, enter:
# cp /etc/system /etc/system.old
# vi /etc/system

Add / modify the following lines:

set noexec_user_stack=1
set noexec_user_stack_log=1

Where,

  • noexec_user_stack=1 : Turn on buffer overflow protection
  • set noexec_user_stack_log=1 : Enable the Logging of Executable Stack Messages.

Finally, reboot the system:
# init 6

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