Suse Linux install vmware tools

Posted on in Categories , , , last updated September 20, 2007

Q. I’m using OpenSuse as Guest OS (VPS). Installing SUSE Linux as a VMware Workstation guest operating system was easy task. But how do I setup and install SUSE Linux as a VMware Guest? How do I install vmware tools to improve performance?

A. In order to install Vmware tools, you need to build kernel modules. Building kernel modules is easy provided that following packages are installed on the guest OpenSuse / Suse Linux (VPS):

=> kernel-source

=> binutils

=> make

=> gcc

=> gcc-c++

Install required software

Login to guest oses using SSH or Vmware server console. Use yast command (yast control center) to install required software:
# yast
Select Software > Software management > Add above packages > Accept and install the softwares
The Software Management tool in YaST text mode
(YaST text mode software installation)

If you are using a GUI, you should see screen as follows (YaST2 screen):
YaST2 GUI

Start VMWARE Tools installation

You need to start VMware tools installation from Vmware server console or Vmware Workstation VM menu.
Click on VM Menu > Select Install Vmware Tools… > Click on Install
Start VMWARE Tools installation

Mount the VMware Tools virtual CD

If you are using guest system’s desktop, you should have mounted a CD. If you are using text mode, run mount command as follows:
# mount /dev/hdc /media
Output:

mount: block device /dev/hdc is write-protected, mounting read-only

Replace /dev/hdc with actual virtual cd rom drive.

Install the VMware Tools RPM

Finally install rpm file,
cd /media
ls
rpm -ivh VMwareTools-1.0.3-44356.i386.rpm

Configure Vmware tools

Next you need to run the VMware Tools configuration script. You must run script from VMWare server console / Workstation and not from SSH session:
# vmware-config-tools.pl
OR
# vmware-config-tools.pl -default

Sun Solaris UNIX display list for loaded kenel device driver / modules

Posted on in Categories , , last updated August 20, 2007

Q. How do I display information about loaded kernel modules under Sun Solaris UNIX operating system?

A. You need to use modinfo command which is a trivial program to display information about the loaded modules. The format of the information is as follows:

Id Loadaddr Size Info Rev Module Name

where Id is the module ID, Loadaddr is the starting text address in hexadecimal, Size is the size of text, data, and bss in hexadecimal bytes, Info is module specific information, Rev is the revision of the loadable modules system, and Module Name is the filename and description of the module.

Task: Displaying the status of kernel modules

Just enter modinfo command:
modinfo
You can pass -c option to modinfo command to display the number of instances of the module loaded and the module’s current state:
modinfo -c

Display information about particular module / driver only

You can also display information about particular module only by specifying its ID #:
modinfo -i 5
The above example displays the status of module # 5.

Read modinfo man page for other information and options.

Linux Kernel panic VFS Unable to mount root fs and solution

Posted on in Categories , last updated March 13, 2008

Q. I am using Linux on HP server and I am getting error that read as follows:
Linux Kernel panic: VFS: Unable to mount root fs

How do I solve this problem?

A. Most modern distributions including Debian uses loadable kernel module for ext3 file system. So to read ext3/ext2 file system kernel must load ext3 kernel module (ext3.ko).

This module is included in an initrd image. If an initrd image is missing or that image does not include suitable kernel modules to access the ext3 filesystem on the partition, an error message (Linux Kernel panic: VFS: Unable to mount root fs) will be displayed to you.

To solve this problem you need to use mkinitrd script that constructs a directory structure that can serve as an initrd root file system.

The instructions for creating initrd images are here on our site.