Dell says Linux driver Support is Key and promises to work with other Vendors

Posted on in Categories Linux desktop, Linux distribution, News last updated March 31, 2007

I was too busy with the projects I was doing. Anyway I’m back now and free to blog again.

Dell has a blog post to their report about upcoming Linux offerings on desktop and laptop systems:

A few trends emerged from the comments and I want to address them directly in this and future posts. This post focuses on our strategy for device drivers. All of the practices described here are available today — you can enact them yourselves too.

I hope dell will start to offer Linux desktop system, as I need to upgrade my Intel 1.7Ghz desktop system with 24” LCD display.

Also Dell need to make sure that Linux based hardware available across the globe, not just in US. There are some desktop/laptop models not available in India. These days I don’t have much time to build whitebox PC. Also I don’t like HP desktop systems at all.

Linux programming – system call howto

Posted on in Categories News last updated March 23, 2007

Learn about kernel command using Linux system calls – explore the SCI and add your own calls.

A system call is an interface between a user-space application and a service that the kernel provides. Because the service is provided in the kernel, a direct call cannot be performed; instead, you must use a process of crossing the user-space/kernel boundary. The way you do this differs based on the particular architecture. For this reason, I’ll stick to the most common architecture, i386.

System calls are an efficient way of traversing between user-space and the kernel to request services in the kernel-space. But they are also tightly controlled, and it’s much easier simply to add a new /proc file system entry to provide the user/kernel interactions. When speed is important, however, system calls are an ideal way to squeeze the greatest performance out of your application.

Linux’ system calls — we use them every day. But do you know how a system call is performed from user-space to the kernel — Explore the Linux system call interface (SCI), learn how to add new system calls (and alternatives for doing so), and discover utilities related to the SCI.)

Read more

Microsoft listed as most secure os

Posted on in Categories News, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, UNIX, Windows, Windows server last updated March 22, 2007

Here goes most secure os listing…
#1 Microsoft
#2 Redhat
#3 Apple OS X

….
..

The Symantec Internet security threat report offers analysis and discussion of threat activity over a six-month period. It covers Internet attacks, vulnerabilities, malicious code, phishing, spam and security risks as well as future trends.

Sun Solaris and HP-UX listed at last position. My personal experience shows that both Linux and BSD offer superior security. I’m just wondering what if they consider OpenBSD next time ;)

From the article:

Microsoft is frequently dinged for having insecure products, with security holes and vulnerabilities. But Symantec , no friend of Microsoft, said in its latest research report that when it comes to widely-used operating systems, Microsoft is doing better overall than its leading commercial competitors.

The report is available here.

Download Solaris UNIX Intel x86 / Sparc Adobe Flash players

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Links, Linux desktop, News, Solaris, UNIX last updated March 22, 2007

This is a good move, especially considering increase in AMD64 workstation from Sun.

From the official blog:

The fact that Flash Player 9 Unix support is presently limited to Linux/x86 has been the source of some consternation to the users of some non-Linux/non-x86 Unix systems. You may be interested to learn that Unix platform support has recently been expanded. There are now beta versions of Flash Player 9 available from Adobe Labs

Download Adobe Flash player for Sun Solaris

=> Get flashplayer for Solaris

You can find more details here (via penguin.swf)

Why Linus Torvalds Loves GPL v2

Posted on in Categories Beyond nixCraft, GNU/Open source, News last updated March 22, 2007

This is the Torvalds Transcript about – Why he ‘Absolutely Love’ GPL Version 2.

On March 6, Linus Torvalds responded to e-mail questions on GPL version 3 sent by InformationWeek editor at large Charles Babcock.

Torvalds said:

First off, I don’t even know what the GPLv3 will look like. I would be totally crazy to accept a license for my code sight unseen

Oh on a related note this post talks about why GPL should help Microsoft in a long run:

…Some open source licenses don’t readily lend themselves to commercial open source. Apache/BSD licensing, for example, is hard to monetize (directly). But the GPL is very easy to monetize directly: customers get the value they want and competitors are scared to touch it. Everyone (that matters) wins. Microsoft needs to ditch its weird view on the GPL. It used to call it anti-American. It’s actually the exact opposite. It is the most American of open source licenses…

Generally I agree with author but I don’t see M$ opening its Vista or Office 2007 source code in a near future.