Increase Your VMware Virtual Hard Disk Size ( vmdk file )

Posted on in Categories Backup, Hardware, Howto, Linux desktop, Linux Virtualization, Storage, Sys admin, Tips, Ubuntu Linux, vmware, windows vista last updated June 9, 2009

I’ve Windows Vista installed as a guest under Ubuntu Linux using VMWARE Workstation 6.0. This is done for testing purpose and browsing a few site that only works with Internet Explorer. Since I only use it for testing I made 16GB for Vista and 5GB for CentOS and 5GB in size for FreeBSD guest operating systems. However, after some time I realized I’m running out of disk space under both CentOS and Vista. Adding a second hard drive under CentOS solved my problem as LVM was already in use. Unfortunately, I needed to double 32GB space without creating a new D: drive under Windows Vista. Here is a simple procedure to increase your Virtual machine’s disk capacity by resizing vmware vmdk file.

How To Use Gmail Account To Relay Email From a Shell Prompt

Posted on in Categories Backup, Debian Linux, fedora linux, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Tip of the day last updated April 5, 2009

Usually, you do not need to setup an email server under Linux desktop operating system. Most GUI email clients (such as Thunderbird) supports Gmail POP3 and IMAP configurations. But, how do you send mail via the standard or /usr/bin/mail user agents or a shell script? Programs such as sendmail / postfix / exim can be configured as a gmail smarthost but they are largely overkill for this use.

Linux Create Incremental Backups Using FlyBack GUI Time Machine Backup Software

Posted on in Categories Backup, Data recovery, Gnome, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop last updated January 21, 2008

This is an excellent backup utility for new Linux user.

Apple’s Time Machine is a great feature in their OS, and Linux has almost all of the required technology already built in to recreate it. This is a simple GUI to make it easy to use.

Time Machine, like many backup utilities, creates incremental backups of files which can be restored at a later date. It also supports limited restoration of files within applications that are specifically programmed to use Time Machine’s functionality.
FlyBack: a Time Machine backup utility for Linux
(Fig. 01: Linux FlyBack Software in Action)

Download and Installation instructions

=> FlyBack – Apple’s Time Machine for Linux (via Bernaz’s Weblog)

Rotate FTP Backup Using a Shell Script

Posted on in Categories Backup, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Shell scripting, Tips, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated January 20, 2008

I’ve already written about rotating sftp / ssh backup shell script to remove directories (old backup files). However, a few of our readers would like to know more about removing old backup directories using ftp. As usual, you need accurate date and time on local system and remote backup directory must be in dd-mm-yyyy or mm-dd-yyyy format. For example daily mysql backup should be stored in /mysql/dd-mm-yyyy format.

Sample Shell Script

Here is a simple and dirty shell script to remove old backups ( download link ):

#!/bin/bash
# call ./script.sh 03-2007 - to remove all March-2007 directories in 01-03-2007, 02-03-2007, 31-03-2007 format
# you must have ncftp ftp client installed on BSD / Linux box
BASE="/mysql" # base dir below that dd-mm-yyyy
[ $# -eq 0 ] && exit 1 || :
DELETE="$1"
echo "Getting old directories..."
ncftpls -u 'ftp-user-name' -p 'ftp-password' -x "-t" ftp://ftp.your-server.com${BASE} > /tmp/ftp.out
LIST="$(grep ${DELETE} /tmp/ftp.out)"
echo -n "Starting removal for ${DELETE}..."
for dir in $LIST
do
 rdir="${BASE}/${dir}"
# echo "Processing ${dir}..."
 ncftp -L -u 'ftp-user-name' -p 'ftp-password' ftp.your-server.com <<EOF
 cd $rdir
 rm *
 rmdir $rdir
 quit
EOF
done

Run the script as follows to remove all backup for Dec-2007, enter:
$ ./script.sh 12-2007

Related: Generate backup ftp script using php based wizard

Mirror directory with mirrordir command

Posted on in Categories Backup, Howto, Linux, UNIX last updated November 29, 2007

rsyn is the best tool for mirroring servers and data. However, there is also mirrordir tool. As name suggest it can mirror directories and do lots of other things. It offers lots of options for die hard shell scripting fans. It can copy, mirror directory trees via a minimal set of changes, locally or over FTP, or over a secure tcp connection.

From the man page:

mirrordir copies files that are different between the directories control and mirror to the directory mirror. Files whose modification times or sizes differ are copied. File permissions, ownerships, modification times, access times (only if –access-times is used), sticky bits, and device types are duplicated. Symlinks are duplicated without any translation. Symlink modification and access times (of the symlink itself, not the file it points to) are not preserved. Hard linked files are merely copied.

mirrordir command supports strong stream cipher encryption and Diffie-Hellman key exchanges with several possible key sizes.

Install mirrordir

Use apt-get or ports system command:
$ sudo apt-get install mirrordir

mirrordir examples

Mirror ~/scripts to ~/scripts.backup:
$ mkdir ~/scripts.backup
$ mirrordir -v ~/scripts ~/scripts.backup

If you rerun mirrordir again, only the updated files are copied.

You can mirroring FTP sites:
$ mirrordir -v ftp://ftp.nixcraft.in/pub /home/backup/nixcraft.in/ftp/pub

mirrordir offers tons of option, refer mirrordir man page for more examples and options:
$ man mirrordir

Linux mobile phone manager – Wammu

Posted on in Categories Backup, Download of the day, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop last updated November 29, 2007

Wammu is mobile phone manager running on Linux, Windows and possibly other platforms, where Gammu and wxPython works. The communication is made by Gammu library. With this software you can:
=> Edit / delete contacts, todo, calendar etc
=> Send files
=> Text (sms) composer for multi part smses
=> Search phone
=> Backup etc

Phones supported by Gammu:

* Nokia DCT3 (3210, 3310, 3330, 3390, 3410, 5110, 5110i, 5130, 5190, 5210, 5510, 6110, 6130, 6150, 6190, 8210, 8250, 8290, 8850, 8855, 8890 6210, 6250, 7110, 9110) and compatible

* Nokia DCT4 (3510, 3510i, 3530, 5100, 6100, 6310, 6310i, 6510, 6610, 7210, 8310, 8910) and compatible

* Siemens M20, MC35, SL45 and compatible

* Alcatel One Touch 501, 701, 715, 535, 735

* Sony Ericsson phones

* AT compatible phones

* Symbian phones up to Symbian 9.0 are supported through gnapplet

Install wammu – Phone manager

Debian / Ubuntu Linux user, enter:
$ sudo apt-get install wammu

Download Wammu

Visit official project home page here

Please note that wammu also works under Windows XP.

CentOS / Red Hat Linux: Install and manage iSCSI Volume

Posted on in Categories Backup, CentOS, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Storage last updated October 30, 2007

Internet SCSI (iSCSI) is a network protocol s that allows you to use of the SCSI protocol over TCP/IP networks. It is good alternative to Fibre Channel-based SANs. You can easily manage, mount and format iSCSI Volume under Linux. It allows access to SAN storage over Ethernet.

Open-iSCSI Project

Open-iSCSI project is a high-performance, transport independent, multi-platform implementation of iSCSI. Open-iSCSI is partitioned into user and kernel parts.

Instructions are tested on:
[a] RHEL 5
[b] CentOS 5
[c] Fedora 7
[d] Debian / Ubuntu Linux

Install Required Package

iscsi-initiator-utils RPM package – The iscsi package provides the server daemon for the iSCSI protocol, as well as the utility programs used to manage it. iSCSI is a protocol for distributed disk access using SCSI commands sent over Internet Protocol networks. This package is available under Redhat Enterprise Linux / CentOS / Fedora Linux and can be installed using yum command:
# yum install iscsi-initiator-utils

A note about Debian / Ubuntu Linux

If you are using Debian / Ubuntu Linux install open-iscsi package, enter:
$ sudo apt-get install open-iscsi

iSCSI Configuration

There are three steps needed to set up a system to use iSCSI storage:

  1. iSCSI startup using the init script or manual startup. You need to edit and configure iSCSI via /etc/iscsi/iscsid.conf file
  2. Discover targets.
  3. Automate target logins for future system reboots.
  4. You also need to obtain iSCSI username, password and storage server IP address (target host)

Step # 1: Configure iSCSI

Open /etc/iscsi/iscsid.conf with vi text editor:
# vi /etc/iscsi/iscsid.conf
Setup username and password:
node.session.auth.username = My_ISCSI_USR_NAME
node.session.auth.password = MyPassword
discovery.sendtargets.auth.username = My_ISCSI_USR_NAME
discovery.sendtargets.auth.password = MyPassword

Where,

  • node.session.* is used to set a CHAP username and password for initiator authentication by the target(s).
  • discovery.sendtargets.* is used to set a discovery session CHAP username and password for the initiator authentication by the target(s)

You may also need to tweak and set other options. Refer to man page for more information. Now start the iscsi service:
# /etc/init.d/iscsi start

Step # 2: Discover targets

Now use iscsiadm command, which is a command-line tool allowing discovery and login to iSCSI targets, as well as access and management of the open-iscsi database. If your storage server IP address is 192.168.1.5, enter:
# iscsiadm -m discovery -t sendtargets -p 192.168.1.5
# /etc/init.d/iscsi restart

Now there should be a block device under /dev directory. To obtain new device name, type:
# fdisk -l
or
# tail -f /var/log/messages
Output:

Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel:   Vendor: EQLOGIC   Model: 100E-00           Rev: 3.2
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel:   Type:   Direct-Access                      ANSI SCSI revision: 05
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: SCSI device sdd: 41963520 512-byte hdwr sectors (21485 MB)
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: sdd: Write Protect is off
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: SCSI device sdd: drive cache: write through
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: SCSI device sdd: 41963520 512-byte hdwr sectors (21485 MB)
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: sdd: Write Protect is off
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: SCSI device sdd: drive cache: write through
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel:  sdd: unknown partition table
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: sd 3:0:0:0: Attached scsi disk sdd
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: sd 3:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg3 type 0
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 kernel: rtc: lost some interrupts at 2048Hz.
Oct 10 12:42:20 ora9is2 iscsid: connection0:0 is operational now

/dev/sdd is my new block device.

Step # 3: Format and Mount iSCSI Volume

You can now partition and create a filesystem on the target using usual fdisk and mkfs.ext3 commands:
# fdisk /dev/sdd
# mke2fs -j -m 0 -O dir_index /dev/sdd1

OR
# mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdd1

Tip: If your volume is large size like 1TB, run mkfs.ext3 in background using nohup:
# nohup mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdd1 &

Mount new partition:
# mkdir /mnt/iscsi
# mount /dev/sdd1 /mnt/iscsi

Step #4: Mount iSCSI drive automatically at boot time

First make sure iscsi service turned on at boot time:
# chkconfig iscsi on
Open /etc/fstab file and append config directive:
/dev/sdd1 /mnt/iscsi ext3 _netdev 0 0
Save and close the file.

Further readings: