Red Hat Skips Linux Desktop – As It Is Not A Money Maker

Posted on in Categories Business, Linux desktop, News, RedHat/Fedora Linux last updated April 17, 2008

Red Hat has no plans to create a traditional Linux desktop software for the end user market, but will continue to place its bets on a desktop for commercial markets as it is not making money from them. From the press release:

An explanation: as a public, for-profit company, Red Hat must create products and technologies with an eye on the bottom line, and with desktops this is much harder to do than with servers. The desktop market suffers from having one dominant vendor, and some people still perceive that today’s Linux desktops simply don’t provide a practical alternative. Of course, a growing number of technically savvy users and companies have discovered that today’s Linux desktop is indeed a practical alternative. Nevertheless, building a sustainable business around the Linux desktop is tough, and history is littered with example efforts that have either failed outright, are stalled or are run as charities. But there’s good news too. Technical developments that have become available over the past year or two are accelerating the spread of the Linux Desktop.

Now I’m just wondering where this leaves Fedora Desktop in the long term? Ubuntu Linux seems to doing well and it is going to lead Linux Desktop market along with other distros. Linux is also getting installed on mobile and many tiny devices.

Linux Market Will Rise From $21 Billion To $49 Billion in 2011

Posted on in Categories Business, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux phone, Linux portables, Linux Scalability, News, Windows server last updated April 11, 2008

I’m not surprised at all. Linux runs on tiny phone to large server systems. According to IDC researchers (prediction) – spending on the Linux ecosystem will rise from $21 billion in 2007 to more than $49 billion in 2011, driven by rising enterprise deployments of Linux server operating systems.

Linux server deployments are expanding from infrastructure-oriented applications to more commercially oriented database and enterprise resource-planning workloads “that historically have been the domain of Microsoft Windows and Unix,” noted IDC analysts in a white paper commissioned by the nonprofit Linux Foundation.

“The early adoption of Linux was dominated by infrastructure-oriented workloads, often taking over those workloads from an aging Unix server or Windows NT 4.0 server that was being replaced,” according to the report’s authors, Al Gillen, Elaina Stergiades and Brett Waldman. These days, however, Linux is increasingly being “viewed as a solution for wider and more critical business deployments.”

=> Linux Ecosystem Spending To Exceed $49 Billion

Open Source Will Quietly Take Over

Posted on in Categories Business, GNU/Open source, Linux, News last updated April 5, 2008

According to Gartner, almost all businesses will use open source software:

Open-source promoters have welcomed the endorsement by what is seen as a conservative commentator, but predict the changes will go further than Gartner assumes.

“By 2012, more than 90 percent of enterprises will use open source in direct or embedded forms,” predicts a Gartner report, The State of Open Source 2008, which sees a “stealth” impact for the technology in embedded form: “Users who reject open source for technical, legal or business reasons might find themselves unintentionally using open source despite their opposition.”

=> Gartner: Open source will quietly take over

Open Source Software Developers Make More Money

Posted on in Categories Business, C Programming, GNU/Open source, Links, Linux, Make money with Linux last updated March 3, 2008

If you know open source based application development, you can make more money. A report from New York City-based consulting company Bluewolf says IT salaries across the board will continue to rise in 2008:

The rise of open source software in application development puts developers with a specialization in those technologies in a position to ask for a 30 or 40 percent pay increase, Kirven says. “We’ve gotten more requests from our permanent placement division for open source developers in the last six months than in the last five or six years combined,” he says. “It’s not as easy as getting free software, someone has to get it up and running. LAMP is everywhere now — these types of technologies no one heard of 18 months ago are all the sudden becoming a hot commodity.”