Identify and Verify Gnome Users Based on How They Type

Posted on in Categories Gnome, Hardware, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop last updated April 4, 2008

This tutorial explains GDM (GNOME Display Manager) modification to support user verification through keystroke-dynamics processing. Modified GDM allows only you to login. If you go ahead and tell your password to a friend. They still won’t be able to log in using GDM without knowing the precise method of typing required when entering your user name.

You can create and store a one-way encrypted hash of your keystroke patterns when entering your user name. Add code to GDM to read current keystroke patterns and permit a user to log in when the characteristics are a match.

Many commercial products today provide two-factor authentication on Linux systems. These technologies generally require the purchase of additional hardware and create a closed implementation unsuitable for many environments. The code and processes presented here allow you to implement a low-cost authentication-input system based on the characteristics of how a user types his password into the GDM. Moving beyond examples and into implementation, the modifications to GDM presented here allow you to enhance the security of your computer.

=> Identify and verify users based on how they type

Linux Create Incremental Backups Using FlyBack GUI Time Machine Backup Software

Posted on in Categories Backup, Data recovery, Gnome, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop last updated January 21, 2008

This is an excellent backup utility for new Linux user.

Apple’s Time Machine is a great feature in their OS, and Linux has almost all of the required technology already built in to recreate it. This is a simple GUI to make it easy to use.

Time Machine, like many backup utilities, creates incremental backups of files which can be restored at a later date. It also supports limited restoration of files within applications that are specifically programmed to use Time Machine’s functionality.
FlyBack: a Time Machine backup utility for Linux
(Fig. 01: Linux FlyBack Software in Action)

Download and Installation instructions

=> FlyBack – Apple’s Time Machine for Linux (via Bernaz’s Weblog)

How to: Customize Ubuntu Linux

Posted on in Categories Gnome, Linux, Linux desktop, Ubuntu Linux last updated November 24, 2007

This guide will let you pimp you Ubuntu Linux to look like Windows Vista or Mac OS X. Linux is awesome.
From the article:

Changes are part of Nature so as with Technology, though this cannot be True for Windows and Mac cause the life cycle of a single Version is too much which is not the case with Linux. Open Source evolve at very rapid rate and with evolution comes new & special changes. Today with a hike in Linux acceptance its pretty hard for competitors to provide similar solutions at free of cost… I have tried to kept the guide as simple as I can so that even a newbie can understand how to make changes.There are few major changes in Ubuntu Themes and Icon Control Panel so please read carefully so that you can get everything….

How to: Customization Ubuntu Linux
=> Ubuntu Customization Guide v2

Ubuntu Linux: Turn on 3D Compiz Eye Candy Effects for the X Window System

Posted on in Categories Data recovery, Gnome, Hardware, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Ubuntu Linux last updated December 21, 2007

Compiz brings to life a variety of visual effects that make the Linux desktop easier to use, more powerful and intuitive, and more accessible for users with special needs. It is an OpenGL-based compositing and window-manager. Compiz is the original compositing window manager from Novell’s XGL project. It is developed by David Reveman and community.

Compiz is one of the first compositing window managers for the X Window System that uses 3D graphics hardware to create fast compositing desktop effects for window management.

By default Compiz configuration settings manager is not installed under Ubuntu Linux 7.10. So first install compiz manager:
$ sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager

Please note that compiz only worked with 3D hardware which was supported by Xgl. Most NVIDIA and ATI graphics cards are known to work with Compiz on Xgl. On board Intel card (Intel GMA) also reported working with compiz.

Turn on 3D Compiz Effects

Right Click on Desktop > Change Desktop Background > Select Visual Effect Tab > Select Extra or Custom
Ubuntu Linux: Turn on 3D Compiz Effects for the X Window System
(click to enlarge image)

Save the changes.

How do I use or see the 3D effects?

Now everything is turned on, but how do you use it? Just hit the following key combinations to see effects:

  • ALT + TAB: Switch windows
  • Windows key + Tab: Switch windows
  • Ctrl + Alt + Left/Right Arrow: Switch desktops on cube
  • Ctrl + Alt + Left-click anywhere on wallpaper and drag
  • Try minimizing and maximizing windows
  • Try Dragging windows
  • Double click titlebar
  • Windows key+right-click Zoom-in once
  • Windows key + wheel mouse up : Zoom-in manually

To get idea about 3D effects, please see following youtube video (video may not work inside RSS reader, so click here to view the same):

Further readings:

Compiz Documentation