30 Best Sources For Linux / *BSD / Unix Documentation On the Web

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, FreeBSD, HP-UX, Linux, Linux distribution, OpenBSD, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated February 23, 2012

Man pages are written by sys-admin and developers for IT techs, and are intended more as a reference than as a how to. Man pages are very useful for people who are already familiar with Linux, Unix, and BSD operating systems. Use man pages when you just need to know the syntax for particular commands or configuration file, but they are not helpful for new Linux users. Man pages are not good for learning something new for the first time. Here are thirty best documentation sites on the web for learning Linux and Unix like operating systems.

Choosing UNIX / Linux Operating System Vendor / Software

Posted on in Categories GNU/Open source, Hardware, Howto, HP-UX, Linux, Linux distribution, package management, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Sys admin, Tips, UNIX, Windows server last updated July 4, 2008

UNIX or Linux distros offers many flavors. Managing many UNIX like operating systems can be difficult. Here are few tips about selecting one perfect operating system for your business and sticking it with to save both money and time.

Print / Select a paper size other than A4 when using lp command line utility

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, Hardware, Howto, HP-UX, Linux, OpenBSD, Shell scripting, Suse Linux, Tuning, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated December 21, 2007

Under Linux / UNIX you use lp command to print files from command prompt. lp is quite useful when GUI is not installed on Linux box to print files. The lp command is simply a front end command that calls the lpr command with appropriate options. Its main use is to allow the running of precompiled binary programs and scripts that assume that the lp command is the official printing command.

Changing papa size is very easy under GUI environment. But how do you change paper size under command prompt?
By default lp print to A4 paper size. However sometime you need to print to different paper size from command prompt such as A3 or A5. To print to A3 size, enter:
$ lp -o media=A3 /path/to/file
Where,

  • -o media=size : Sets the page size to size. Most printers support at least the size names “a4”, “letter”, and “legal”.

Other useful examples

Print a double-sided legal document to a printer called “hpljf2”:
$ lp -d hpljf2 -o media=legal -o sides=two-sided-long-edge /path/to/file
Print an image across 4 pages using a printer called “epd2”:
$ lp -d epd2 -o scaling=200 filename
Print a text file with 12 characters per inch, 8 lines per inch, and a 1 inch left margin to a printer called “lpodc2”:
$ lp -d lpodc2 -o cpi=12 -o lpi=8 -o page-left=72 ~/info.txt

To know more about lp option, enter:
$ man lp

Please note that you need to configure print using CUPS configuration file /etc/cups/cupsd.conf or web based tool located at http://localhost:631/
Linux / UNIX CUPS HP printer at http://localhost:631/
(Fig 01: My CUPS Configuration, showing HP PhotoSmart Printer )

Linux Success Story: New York Stock Exchange Moves to Linux

Posted on in Categories Business, Hardware, High performance computing, HP-UX, Linux, News last updated December 15, 2007
Linux Success Story: New York Stock Exchange Moves to Linux

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), is the largest stock exchange in the world. NYSE wants to move away from proprietary platforms, so they selected HP hardware with Linux.

NYSE is investing heavily in x86-based Linux systems and blade servers as it builds out the NYSE Hybrid Market trading system that it launched last year. Flexibility and lower cost are among the goals. But one of the things that NYSE Euronext CIO Steve Rubinow says he most wants from the new computing architecture is technology independence. The NYSE has installed about 200 of HP’s ProLiant DL585 four-processor servers and 400 of its ProLiant BL685c blades, all running Linux and based on dual-core Opteron processors from Advanced Micro Devices Inc.

=> New York Stock Exchange Moves to Linux (Image credit: Wikipedia)