Dell Says Linux Netbook Returns A Non-Issue

Posted on in Categories Hardware, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Linux portables, News, Windows, windows vista last updated August 13, 2009

Microsoft chief operating officer Kevin Turner recently talked about netbook and claimed that retailers experiencing higher return rates as compare to MS-Windows operating systems:

And the reason that we were able to make so much traction – because this is the first real test of the value of Windows – the reason we were able to make so much traction on this particular space is because we went to retailers and said, “Hey, what are your return rates on these Linux netbooks that you are getting?” And they said, “Oh, gosh, they’re, like, four or five times higher than what we’re seeing on other PCs that have Windows.” I said, “Exactly.” So let’s do the TCO story. Let’s talk to customers. And you can’t find a retailer – I challenge you to find a retailer who wants to sell Linux on these netbooks, because the returns are bad. The customer complaints are bad. And our ability to really showcase the value proposition with Windows has never been greater and was never tested more than it was with this particular product. But we’ve made great progress there, but the up-sell opportunities with Windows 7, because it runs so well on these low-end laptops, is going to be tremendous for us.

Linux Market Will Rise From $21 Billion To $49 Billion in 2011

Posted on in Categories Business, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux phone, Linux portables, Linux Scalability, News, Windows server last updated April 11, 2008

I’m not surprised at all. Linux runs on tiny phone to large server systems. According to IDC researchers (prediction) – spending on the Linux ecosystem will rise from $21 billion in 2007 to more than $49 billion in 2011, driven by rising enterprise deployments of Linux server operating systems.

Linux server deployments are expanding from infrastructure-oriented applications to more commercially oriented database and enterprise resource-planning workloads “that historically have been the domain of Microsoft Windows and Unix,” noted IDC analysts in a white paper commissioned by the nonprofit Linux Foundation.

“The early adoption of Linux was dominated by infrastructure-oriented workloads, often taking over those workloads from an aging Unix server or Windows NT 4.0 server that was being replaced,” according to the report’s authors, Al Gillen, Elaina Stergiades and Brett Waldman. These days, however, Linux is increasingly being “viewed as a solution for wider and more critical business deployments.”

=> Linux Ecosystem Spending To Exceed $49 Billion

Quick tip: Tell what hardware is connected via USB to my Linux desktop

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux laptop, Linux portables, Troubleshooting, Ubuntu Linux last updated July 6, 2007

USB devices are quite common these days. I’ve digital cam, Pen drive, external hard disk, mouse and other stuff. So how do I tell what hardware is connected via USB to my Linux desktop?

lsusb is a utility for displaying information about USB buses in the system and the devices connected to them. To make use of all the features of this program, you need to have a Linux kernel which supports the /proc/bus/usb interface.

-v command option is very informative. It tells lsusb to be verbose and display detailed information about the devices shown. This includes configuration descriptors for the device’s current speed. Class descriptors will be shown, when available, for USB device classes including hub, audio, HID, communications, and chipcard.

lsusb command Examples

lsusb
lsusb -t
lsusb -v

What is Nokia Maemo Linux?

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux Embedded devices, Linux portables last updated May 29, 2007

From the my mailbag:

A friend of mine was talking about Maemo Linux. Can you explain what is Nokia maemo Linux?

What is Nokia Maemo Linux?

The Nokia N800 Internet tablet is a wireless Internet appliance from Nokia. The N800 was developed as the successor to the Nokia 770. It is designed for:
a] Wireless Internet browsing
b] E-mail functions
c] Includes software such as Internet radio, an RSS news reader, image viewer and media players for selected types of media.

Maemo Linux is used in Nokia N800. It is a development platform for handheld devices. You can think Maemo as a desktop for handled device. It is modified version of Debian Linux. According to project webpage:

Maemo provides an open source development platform for Nokia Internet Tablets and other Linux-based devices. It is build from components widely used in open desktop and mobile systems. We strive to make maemo open, accessible and useful to all developers wanting to squeeze the possibilities of the mobile desktop and the Internet.

The maemo SDK contains the tools needed to create and port integrated applications, replicating the Internet Tablet environment in your PC. The Hildon Application Framework is a good entry point to understand the peculiarities of this platform. A shortcut for you to consider.

This website offers official documentation, tutorials, bug reporting tools and repositories of unstable versions for testing. It also provides services devoted to and maintained by the maemo community: software catalog, project hosting, documentation wiki, Planet news plus mail and IRC support channels.

You can purchase this cool toy N800 at Amazon! I’m going to get one before XMS 😀

Howto build an open source digital entertainment system using MythTV

Posted on in Categories GNU/Open source, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux portables, OS X, Ubuntu Linux, Windows, X server last updated May 28, 2007

MythTV is a GPL licensed suite of applications that, together, provide a complete home entertainment system. The system’s capabilities include television, movies, music, photography and the display of other information like weather and news. It has been developed using only open source components and works under a variety of operating systems from Linux to Mac OS X.

This TechBrief provides an introduction to the leading open source home media convergence system, Mythical TV, more commonly referred to as MythTV.

MythTV is a digital entertainment suite that is as sophisticated as any commercial system available on the market today. Part 1 serves as an introduction to MythTV and guide to install the latest development frontend and backend on Ubuntu Linux. It covers building the development branch of the project suite using the latest source. Due to the complexity and variations of hardware and software, this brief will only focus on North American service. Part 2 will focus on building and installing the complete set of official modules.

LinuxBIOS available with X11 GUI

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux Embedded devices, Linux portables, X server last updated March 8, 2007

Wow this is really cool news.

LinuxBIOS is a Free Software project aimed at replacing the proprietary BIOS you can find in most of today’s PCs.

Linux BIOS in action

Alan has posted video of his work. This setup includes
=> LinuxBIOS

=> Linux kernel

=> BusyBox

=> Tiny X11 server called Kdrive

=> The Matchbox window manager

=> rxvt – a colour vt102 terminal emulator

All of the above software packed on a 2MB flash chip :).

Video

Found via Uwe Hermann blog

Howto Create Custom Fedora Linux Live CDs

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Linux portables, RedHat/Fedora Linux last updated March 6, 2007

You can create your very own custom Live CD from your very own custom configuration with this step-by-step guide.

In December 2006, the Fedora Linux distribution released its first official Live CD, which, thanks to an intelligent selection of applications, nicely advertises the best features of Fedora. In addition to many applications, the Live CD has several games, uses the Compiz 3D desktop, and is accessible by non-English speaking users. But what stole the show for me was David Zeuthen’s livecd tools, which make creating and maintaining a custom Fedora-based Live CD a walk in the park.

Though Fedora Linux is a popular and mature Linux distribution, and many people have created Live CD distributions based on Fedora, the Fedora project itself didn’t released its first official Live CD until December 2006. Learn how to build your own custom and easy-to-use Live CDs using a rewrite of Pilgrim, the Fedora Live CD creation tool.

=> Build a Fedora Live CD

Wizpy Linux – Boot Linux from media player

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop, Linux Embedded devices, Linux portables last updated February 2, 2007

Wizpy is a portable media player produced by Turbolinux.

Wizpy player has the usual music/video capabilities–plus a bootable version of Linux, a browser, productivity apps, and more 🙂

Tech Spec

=> 1.71″ OLED screen
=> 4GB flash memory
=> It supports, Ogg/MP3/WMA/AAC,DivX medias
=> Built in FM radio
=> Built-in microphone
=> Still picture display
=> Text viewer and much more

Wizpy Cost

It will come in two models:

  • a 2GB version will cost $245
  • a 4GB version will cost $281

By connecting it to a computer, the Wizpy can act as a portable hard drive.
Wizpy Linux - Boot Linux from media player

More info:

I want one 😀