BIND 9 Dynamic Update DoS Security Update

Posted on in Categories BIND Dns, CentOS, Debian Linux, fedora linux, FreeBSD, Howto, Linux, Networking, package management, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Solaris, Suse Linux, Sys admin, UNIX, Windows server last updated July 29, 2009

BIND 9 is an implementation of the Domain Name System (DNS) protocols. named daemon is an Internet Domain Name Server for UNIX like operating systems. Dynamic update messages may be used to update records in a master zone on a nameserver. When named receives a specially crafted dynamic update message an internal assertion check is triggered which causes named to exit. An attacker which can send DNS requests to a nameserver can cause it to exit, thus creating a Denial of Service situation. configuring named to ignore dynamic updates is NOT sufficient to protect it from this vulnerability. This exploit is public. Please upgrade immediately.

Top 10 Linux Virtualization Software

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Linux Scalability, Linux Virtualization, Networking, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Solaris, Storage, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX, vmware, Windows server, xen last updated December 31, 2008

Virtualization is the latest buzz word. You may wonder computers are getting cheaper every day, why should I care and why should I use virtualization? Virtualization is a broad term that refers to the abstraction of computer resources such as:

  1. Platform Virtualization
  2. Resource Virtualization
  3. Storage Virtualization
  4. Network Virtualization
  5. Desktop Virtualization

This article describes why you need virtualization and list commonly used FOSS and proprietary Linux virtualization software.

Linux: Should You Use Twice the Amount of Ram as Swap Space?

Posted on in Categories data center, Debian Linux, fedora linux, File system, FreeBSD, Gentoo Linux, kernel, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux laptop, OpenBSD, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Solaris, Storage, Suse Linux, Tuning, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated June 8, 2017

Linux and other Unix-like operating systems use the term “swap” to describe both the act of moving memory pages between RAM and disk and the region of a disk the pages are stored on. It is common to use a whole partition of a hard disk for swapping. However, with the 2.6 Linux kernel, swap files are just as fast as swap partitions. Now, many admins (both Windows and Linux/UNIX) follow an old rule of thumb that your swap partition should be twice the size of your main system RAM. Let us say I’ve 32GB RAM, should I set swap space to 64 GB? Is 64 GB of swap space required? How big should your Linux / UNIX swap space be?

Download 64 Bit Linux Flash Player Beta Version

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Hardware, Links, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Solaris, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated November 17, 2008

Finally, Adobe has released 64 bit preview version of its most popular flash player today for Linux / Solaris UNIX operating system. There is no Windows or Mac 64 bit version exists but Linux / UNIX is the first OS to get it. Indeed a good news; now we have both Java and Flash plyaer for 64 bit platforms. No need to use nspluginwrapper.