Basic difference between the GPL and the public domain

Posted on in Categories FAQ, GNU/Open source last updated February 1, 2007

My last post brought a new question:

What are the key differences between GNU GPL Free software licenses and public domain software?

Public domain software allows anyone to do whatever they want with software. In short software is not subject to copyright. No person or other legal entity can establish or maintain proprietary interests within a particular legal jurisdiction. See wikipedia article for more information.

GNU GPL is a copyright license. You can use and distribute software under the terms and condition of its license only.

Hope this clears the difference between GPL and public domain software.

Posted by: Vivek Gite

The author is the creator of nixCraft and a seasoned sysadmin and a trainer for the Linux operating system/Unix shell scripting. He has worked with global clients and in various industries, including IT, education, defense and space research, and the nonprofit sector. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook, Google+.

4 comment

  1. Can you give an example for ‘public domain’ software? I am aware of works of art slipping into the public domain after some 70 years or so after they are made – but I have never heard about a public domain software.

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