Download of the day: Fedora 7 CD / DVD ISO

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux Embedded devices, RedHat/Fedora Linux last updated June 1, 2007

Update: Nov-25,2008: Fedora Linux 10 has been related and available for download.

Update: Nov-7,2007: Fedora Linux 8 has been related and available for download here.

Fedora 7 has been released. The Fedora Project is a Red Hat sponsored and community supported open source project. Its goal is the rapid progress of free and open source software and content. It offers cutting edge softwares for desktop usage. The latest version of the popular Linux distribution has a lot to offer users and developers.

New in Fedora 7

=> This release features GNOME 2.18 and KDE 3.5.6.

=> This release integrates Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) technology with Fedora’s graphical virt-manager and command-line virsh tools. KVM provides a hardware accelerated virtualization solution, and users have a choice between KVM and Xen, along with Qemu, in this release.

=> In this release, the performance of yum, Pirut, and Pup have been significantly improved.

=> This release features integration of a new FireWire stack in the kernel for more robust device handling.

=> Fedora now includes improved power management through implementation of dynamic ticks in the kernel.

Fedora
(click to enlarge, more screenshots @ Fedora Website)

=> I can now install Fedora on my Sony VAIO Notebooks

=> See Fedora 7 release notes.

Download link – ( Download Fedora )

Download of the day: Fedora Core 7 CD / DVD ISO
You can download Fedora via the web/ftp server or via BitTorrent (recommended).

Fedora 7 DVD ISO download

= > Visit mirror to download Fedora ISO images (2.7 GB)

Fedora 7 Live CD ISO download

=> Use Live CD (700M) if internet connection is slow or you just want to see how Fedora works. You can install fedora from Live cd.

Fedora 7 DVD ISO BitTorrent download

=> Download from BitTorrent (requires a BitTorrent client)

Linux success story – Using Linux at Work

Posted on in Categories Beyond nixCraft, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, News last updated November 11, 2006

Yet another Linux success story, from the article:

I am by no stretch of the imagination a Linux expert, but my overall experience has been excellent and I shall continue to use Fedora for my day to day work. My productivity has not been affected at all, and anyone who wants to try something different, or take a cheaper OS route, should consider a look at Linux – it’s really not that scary.

I’ve been programming since a young age, and Linux has always seemed like a natural progression, especially as my development environment is PHP/MySQL/Apache. A while ago, this was all done on a Red Hat installed system, using the “Plesk” web interface. Although I spent quite a few hours at the console sorting out problems, Plesk hid the real nitty gritty from me and I was often just following “How Tos” in order to get things fixed. In saying that, I did manage to write a wrapper script that fixed a compatibility between MailMan and Plesk, so I wasn’t doing too badly. However, I would hardly say I felt confident in Linux, and using it for my day to day work seemed strangely frightening.

Read more, Using Linux at Work…

Linux Iptables: HowTo Block or Open HTTP/Web Service Port 80 & 443

Posted on in Categories Iptables, Linux last updated July 11, 2005

By default Apache webserver listen on port 80 (http) and port 443 (https i.e. secure http). Apache webserver uses the TCP protocol to transfer information/data between server and browser. The default Iptables configuration does not allow inbound access to the HTTP (80) and HTTPS (443) ports used by the web server. This post explains how to allow inbound and outbound access to web services under Linux.