apt-p2p: How To Upgrade Ubuntu 8.10 Using BitTorrent [ Intrepid Ibex ]

Posted on in Categories GNU/Open source, Howto, Links, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Ubuntu Linux last updated October 30, 2008

Today Ubuntu Linux 8.10 final will be released to all mirrors world wild. However, FTP/HTTP mirrors server may down due to heavy demands from users. You can now use BitTorrent to upgrade Ubuntu Linux to 8.10 from old 8.04 version. Help Ubuntu project to spread Linux to humanity.
In the past, the update servers would crash very quickly on a big release day, making it hard for people to get the latest update. With BitTorrent, however, this can be easily avoided.

Install and Run Debian Linux from an Encrypted USB Drive

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, File system, Hardware, Howto, Linux last updated February 20, 2008

Another interesting article with security in mind. From the article:

You’re probably familiar with the live CD concept — a fully functional operating system on a CD that can be run on any computer that boots from its optical drive, without affecting the one(s) already installed. In a similar vein, you can set up Linux to run from a USB hard drive drive on any computer that can boot from USB. The live system offers automatic detection and configuration of the display adapter and screen, storage devices, and other peripherals. A bootable USB drive can run a mainstream Linux distribution such as Debian GNU/Linux, and can be secured, personalised, upgraded, and otherwise modified to suit your needs.

=> Running Debian GNU/Linux from an encrypted USB drive

Why Linux Desktop Does Not Spread – the Curse of Being Free

Posted on in Categories Business, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, OS X, Windows last updated February 18, 2008

This is a philosophical post on why Linux hasn’t grown to challenge Windows as the most popular operating system. From the blog post:

Linux isn’t very popular on the desktop. It’s a far third behind OS X, which is a very far second behind Windows. Most people cite pre-installed operating systems as the reason. But as a student of psychology, I see something most people don’t. There’s one big factor in why Linux isn’t popular on the desktop. Linux is free. I know this sounds like complete dog’s bollocks, but hear me out before judging my sanity.

My personal experience suggests that people don’t use GNU/Linux on desktop because :

  1. Steep learning curve
  2. Software incompatibility or doesn’t run the software they want
  3. Installing and obtaining drivers may be issue for average joe
  4. Finally, human psyche is complex subject. There are people who buy expensive apple hardware and install Linux on it. You just can’t predicate human behavior.

I use Linux on desktop because I work with a Linux / UNIX server all day and I find that using it on the desktop as well actually makes my life easier. You know one-size-fits-all approach may be unrealistic in a real life. I see my workplace desktops fully loaded with mix of Linux, OS X and dominated by Windows XP pro.

=> Why Linux Doesn’t Spread – the Curse of Being Free (via slashdot)