Google Code University: Learn How To Code / Program

Posted on in Categories C Programming, Howto, News, Open source coding last updated March 19, 2008

Good learning stuff – at no cost!

From the page:

This website provides tutorials and sample course content so CS students and educators can learn more about current computing technologies and paradigms. In particular, this content is Creative Commons licensed which makes it easy for CS educators to use in their own classes.

The Courses section contains tutorials, lecture slides, and problem sets for a variety of topic areas:

* AJAX Programming
* Distributed Systems
* Web Security
* Languages

In the Tools 101 section, you will find a set of introductions to some common tools used in Computer Science such as version control systems and databases.

The CS Curriculum Search will help you find teaching materials that have been published to the web by faculty from CS departments around the world. You can refine your search to display just lectures, assignments or reference materials for a set of courses.

=> Google Code University (via Digg)

Google Supporting Photoshop On Linux

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop last updated February 20, 2008

Google is financially supporting Photoshop On Linux. They have hired Codeweavers to run Photoshop better on Linux. From the google blog:

Perhaps the biggest news is that we hired Codeweavers to make Photoshop CS and CS2 work better under Wine. Photoshop is one of those applications that Desktop linux users are constantly clamoring for, and we’re happy to say they work pretty well now. Perhaps not coincidentally, apps like Flash 8 are now starting to work in Wine, too. We look forward to further improvements in this area.

According to Novell, Photoshop is the most requested non-Linux application that Linux users would like to run. Gimp is good but it is without many professional features such as cmyk and others. This is fantastic news for hardcore photoshop users. Good to see google is helping out wine developers 🙂

Linux Success Story: Paypal Powered by 4000 Linux Server Grid

Posted on in Categories Business, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Make money with Linux last updated December 7, 2007

This is yet another Linux success story. PayPal says Linux grid can replace IBM mainframes:

PayPal is currently processing $1,571 worth of transactions per second in 17 different currencies on about 4,000 servers running Red Hat Linux. Thompson supervises a payment system that operates on about 4,000 servers running Red Hat Linux in the same manner that eBay and Google conduct their business on top of a grid of Linux servers. “I have been pleasantly surprised at how much we’ve been able to do with this approach. It operates like a mainframe,” he said.

=> Read complete story here

Access Google Calendar From Linux / UNIX / Mac OS X Command Line Interface

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Linux, OS X, Shell scripting, UNIX last updated October 2, 2007

I use Google Calendar exclusively. However to access this product you need to use a web browser. There is nice program called gcalcli (Google Calendar Command Line Interface) which allows to access Google Calendar from bash shell. Now I can see an agenda using a specified start/end time and date from a shell prompt over ssh session 😀

gcalcli is a Python application that allows you to access you Google Calendar from a command line. It’s easy to get your agenda, search for events, and quickly add new events. Additionally gcalcli can be used as a reminder service to execute any application you want.

Current Features

  1. List your calendars
  2. Show an agenda using a specified start/end time and date
  3. Search for calendar events
  4. “Quick add” new calendar events to your default calendar
  5. Run as a cron job and execute a command for reminders
  6. Work against specific calendars (default, owner, read-only)
  7. Color support
  8. unicode support

Download Google Calendar Command Line Interface

=> Visit official project page here

What you should (and shouldn't) expect from 64-bit Linux?

Posted on in Categories Linux, News last updated September 13, 2006

Update: Many issues mentioned in linked articles are no longer true. This post was originally written way back in 2006.

Nathan Willis has some good information on this topic.

From the article:

So you just bought and assembled a brand-new AMD64 workstation. The only decision that remains is whether to install a 64-bit Linux distribution, or stick with comfortable, tried-and-true IA-32. If you are seeking an easy answer to that question, I can’t help you. Running 64-bit Linux has its pros and cons. Unfortunately, a lot of the cons are out of your hands — but they’re not really Linux’s fault, either.

For starters, you should know that there are essentially no proprietary applications for a 64-bit Linux desktop. Google, Adobe, iD, Skype, and the rest of the independent software vendors (ISV) who release Linux binaries of their apps by and large do so solely for 32-bit Intel architecture only.

Read more at Linux.com…

Google internal and Linux

Posted on in Categories Linux, News last updated August 7, 2006

As many of you may already know, Google uses a version of Red Hat to power their servers, running on old kernels.

Check out Toby DiPasquale’s Google internal talk (slides). To be frank I am only aware of 2 or 4 way standard cluster system. But this is a massive parallel system build by Google for performance.

Interesting and massive stuff used by Google and powered by penguin 🙂 (via Lyz Krumbach blog)