Get Information About Your BIOS / Server Hardware From a Shell Without Opening Chassis ( BIOS Decoder )

Posted on in Categories Hardware, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop last updated July 24, 2008

biosdecode is a command line utility to parses the BIOS memory and prints information about all structures (or entry points) it knows of. You can find out more information about your hardware such as:
=> IPMI Device
=> Type of memory and speed
=> Chassis Information
=> Temperature Probe
=> Cooling Device
=> Electrical Current Probe
=> Processor and Memory Information
=> Serial numbers
=> BIOS version
=> PCI / PCIe Slots and Speed
=> Much more

biosdecode parses the BIOS memory and prints the following information about all structures :
=> SMBIOS (System Management BIOS)
=> DMI (Desktop Management Interface, a legacy version of SMBIOS)
=> SYSID
=> PNP (Plug and Play)
=> ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power Interface)
=> BIOS32 (BIOS32 Service Directory)
=> PIR (PCI IRQ Routing)
=> 32OS (BIOS32 Extension, Compaq-specific)
=> VPD (Vital Product Data, IBM-specific)
=> FJKEYINF (Application Panel, Fujitsu-specific)

In this tip you will learn about decoding BIOS data (dumping a computer’s DMI ) and getting all information about computer hardware without rebooting the server.
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Getting Yesterdays or Tomorrows Day With Bash Shell Date Command

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, Shell scripting, Tips, UNIX last updated June 15, 2011

When invoked without arguments, the date command displays the current date and time. Depending on the options specified, date will set the date and time or print it in a user defined way. I’ve seen many sysadmin writing perl scripts for calculating relative date such as yesterdays or tomorrows day. You can use GNU date command, which is designed to handle relative date calculation such as:

  • 1 Year
  • 2 Days
  • 2 Days ago
  • 5 Years