Tutorial: Ubuntu Linux on a Handheld / Mobile Device

last updated in Categories Hardware, Linux, Linux distribution, Linux Embedded devices, Ubuntu Linux

Ubuntu Linux is a great server and desktop distribution for x86 computers, but did you know that it’s also ideal for handheld and mobile embedded devices?

Ubuntu’s latest release, Gutsy Gibbon, now includes support for the embedded and mobile spaces with the Ubuntu Mobile and Embedded (UME) project. Get to know the UME project, and find out how to get started. The primary objective of this tutorial is to get you quickly acquainted with the Ubuntu embedded framework and tools. Along the way, you learn about several tools and new approaches to Linux kernel configuration and environment construction. You also learn about some other projects with goals similar to the UME project.

Topics

  • Introduction to the Ubuntu Mobile and Embedded (UME) project, its architecture, and its use
  • How to install and test the Hildon desktop
  • How to build a development environment for a mobile device
  • Other mobile platforms

=> Explore Ubuntu Mobile and Embedded [ free registration required ]

Linux device driver tutorial using kernel driver frameworks

last updated in Categories Howto, Linux, Open source coding

A device driver is computer program allowing other computer programs to interact with a computer hardware device. Writing a Linux device driver is considered as a black art by many. If you ever been tempted to try writing a device driver, this howto will serve as a kick start guide:

For many seasoned Linux developers, device drivers still remain a bit of a mysterious black art practiced by a select few. While no single article could possibly attempt to covered everything there is to know about writing drivers, Valerie Henson gives us a brief taste of what’s involved, by implementing a device to return “Hello World” using all the major driver frameworks.

On a related note if you just want get a comprehensive overview of kernel configuration and building, a critical task for Linux users and administrators, try Linux Kernel in a Nutshell

/dev/hello_world: A Simple Introduction to Device Drivers under Linux (linuxdevcenter.com)

How to compile and install Linux Kernel 4.19.1 from source code

last updated in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, GNU/Open source, Howto, Linux

Compiling a custom kernel has its advantages and disadvantages. However, new Linux user/admin find it difficult to compile Linux kernel. Compiling kernel needs to understand few things and then type a couple of commands. This step by step howto covers compiling Linux kernel version 4.19.xx under an Ubuntu or Debian Linux. The following instructions successfully tested on an RHEL 7/CentOS 7 (and clones), Debian Linux, Ubuntu Linux and Fedora Linux 28. However, instructions remain the same for any other Linux distribution.