Linus Torvalds Wins Millennium Technology Prize

Posted on in Categories Linux, News last updated April 19, 2012

Linus Torbalds
The Millennium Technology Prize is the largest technology prize in the world and it is awarded once every two years by Technology Academy Finland. The Awarded is given for life-enhancing technological innovation. Linux kernel creator Linus Torvalds and Dr. Shinya Yamanaka won the Millennium Technology Prize, the prominent award for technological innovation for 2012.

Video: Who Writes Linux Kernel?

Posted on in Categories Linux last updated April 3, 2012

Linux kernel is the most prominent examples of free and open source software. The Linux kernel has received contributions from thousands of programmers and companies around the world. This professional video from the Linux foundation provides a quick insight into Linux building procedure. This is a powerful and inspiring story of how Linux has become a volunteer-driven phenomenon.

Linus Torvalds Switched Back To Gnome

Posted on in Categories Gnome, Kde, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Linux laptop last updated January 24, 2009

Linus Torvalds, Linux’s creator, dislikes the GNOME desktop. There was a big flame war(s) between Linus Torvalds and the GNOME community. At one point he claimed that – “Gnome seems to be developed by interface Nazis and that its developers believe their users are idiots“. And guess what? Who made the switch to Gnome?

Who Writes Linux – Insight Into Individual Linux Kernel Contributors

Posted on in Categories Linux, News last updated April 2, 2008

A report from the Linux Foundation details individual kernel contributions and suggests enterprise use is expanding. However there is elite group inside community. During the past three years, the top 10 individual developers have contributed nearly 15 per cent of the changes to the kernel, while the top 30 developers have submitted 30 per cent, the report states.

Al Viro, David S. Miller and Adrian Bunk authored most of the patches; Andrew Morton came in fifth. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, is found far down on the list. Viro has contributed 1,571 changes to the kernel, which sits at the core of the Linux operating system, over the past three years.

According to Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation:

Never before in the history of computing have there been so many companies, users and developers united behind one project, specifically one that has seen so much commercial success.

Some interesting facts about Linux kernel

Who is Writing Linux?

  • Every Linux kernel is being developed by nearly 1,000 developers working for more than 100 different corporations.

Who is Sponsoring Linux?

  • More than 70 percent of total contributions to the kernel come from developers working at a range of companies including IBM, Intel, The Linux Foundation, MIPS Technology, MontaVista, Movial, NetApp, Novell and Red Hat.

How Fast is Linux Developed and Released?

  • An average of 3,621 lines of code are added to the kernel tree every day, and a new kernel is released approximately every 2.7 months.

=> Linux Foundation Publishes Study on Linux Development Statistics: Who Writes Linux and Who Supports It

Linus Torvalds on Linux Desktop Operating System

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop last updated February 8, 2008

Don Reisinger wonders – if Linus Torvalds even speaking for Linux anymore:

Even though Linus Torvalds has always been known as a deity-like figure in the world of Linux, lately he has been quite outspoken about where he thinks his operating system is going and what its competitors are doing wrong.

Wired blog has published Linus Torvalds thoughts on why users aren’t flocking to Linux:

As always there’s a laundry list of things Torvalds doesn’t care about — Open Solaris and Sun, for instance — but his thoughts on the future of the Linux desktop are interesting, including this bit: “I have never, ever cared about really anything but the Linux desktop.”

You can read Linus Torvalds thoughts on the Linux desktop and its broader adoption here.

How To Make and Roll Out Your Own Linux Distribution

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution last updated January 24, 2008

This article talks about various methods to roll out your Linux distribution such as simple remaster script in Puppy Linux distribution, LFS or Gentoo Linux. From the article:

Inspired by Richard Stallman, whose strategic vision and courage enabled revolutionary change in computer software, later joined by Linus Torvalds and a group of volunteers, created the greatest DIY operating system the world has ever seen. You, too, can create your own Linux distribution. Here’s how. Whether you want to customize Knoppix, respin an existing distribution of the open-source operating system, like Puppy Linux, or are intent on creating your own package from scratch, we’ll walk you through the process.

=> How To Roll Your Own Linux Distro [informationweek.com]

Video: History of GNU, Linux and Free Software Movements

Posted on in Categories GNU/Open source, Links, Linux, Linux Video, UNIX, Windows last updated January 10, 2008

This is an interesting documentary video which traces the history of GNU, Linux, and the open source and free software movements. It features several interviews with prominent hackers and entrepreneurs (and hackers-cum-entrepreneurs), including Richard Stallman, Michael Tiemann, Linus Torvalds, Larry Augustin, Eric S. Raymond, Bruce Perens, Frank Hecker and Brian Behlendorf.

The film begins in medias res with an IPO, and then sets the historical stage by showing the beginnings of software development back in the day when software was shared on paper tape for the price of the paper itself. It then segues to Bill Gates’s Open Letter to Hobbyists in which he asks Computer Hobbyists to not share, but to buy software. (This letter was written by Gates when Microsoft was still based in Arizona and spelled “Micro-Soft”.) Richard Stallman then explains how and why he left the MIT Lab for Artificial Intelligence in order to devote his life to the development of free software, as well as how he started with the GNU project.


(Note: There is a video embedded within this post, please visit the site to view the video – Time: 1 hr 25 min 9 sec)

Linus Torvalds is interviewed on his development of the Linux kernel as well as on the GNU/Linux naming controversy and Linux’s further evolution, including its commercialization.

Richard Stallman remarks on some of the ideological aspects of open source vis-á-vis Communism and capitalism and well as on several aspects of the development of GNU/Linux.

Michael Tiemann (interviewed in a desert) tells how he met Stallman and got an early version of Stallman’s GCC and founded Cygnus Solutions.

Larry Augustin tells how he combined the resulting GNU software and a normal PC to create a UNIX-like Workstation which cost one third the price of a workstation by Sun Microsystems even though it was three times as powerful. His narrative includes his early dealings with venture capitalists, the eventual capitalization and commodification of Linux for his own company, VA Linux, and ends with its IPO.

Frank Hecker of Netscape tells how Netscape executives released the source code for Netscape’s browser, one of the signal events which made Open Source a force to be reckoned with by business executives, the mainstream media, and the public at large.

PS: You can download video from Google Video for Apple iPOD here.

GPL v2.0 is Perfect for Linux – Says Linus Torvalds

Posted on in Categories GNU/Open source, Links, Linux, News last updated January 8, 2008

Linux creator Linus Torvalds, in an interview being made public by the Linux Foundation Tuesday, stressed that version 2 of the GPL (GNU General Public License) still makes the most sense for the Linux kernel over the newer GPL version 3. Among GPL 3 highlights are protections against patent infringement lawsuits and provisions for license compatibility. Torvalds acknowledged he had spoken out against GPL 3 before it was released. He had opposed digital rights management provisions in early-2006, calling them burdensome.

Linus Torvalds, programmer, creator of the Linux kernel

On patent trolls, he says:

Yeah, they’re kind of like the tourists that you can’t bomb because there’s nothing there to bomb. There are just these individuals that don’t have anything to lose. That breaks the whole cold war model and seems to be one of the reasons that even big companies are now starting to realize that patents and software are a really bad idea.

The in-depth discussion has been split into two parts; the first segment is available today at Linux foundation blog. The next installment will be available in two weeks. Transcripts are also available on the LF website.

=> You can listen to complete conversations podcast here. If you’d rather read a transcript, you can find it here. (via Yahoo news – Image credit Wikipedia Linus article)