Visual Representations Of Linux File Systems

Posted on in Categories File system, Howto, kernel, Linux last updated June 16, 2009

This is an interesting visualization techniques for software analysis. From the article:

Despite being a very important part of any operating system, file systems tend to get little attention. Linux has three editions for Linux Device Drivers, another three for Understanding the Linux Kernel and two for Linux Kernel Development. The first is a detail analysis of one particular Linux Kernel tree and the second is a shorter one done over a large number of file systems from Linux Kernel 2.6.0 to 2.6.29. After that there is a small section that shows some aspects of the BSD family. After conclusions there is an appendix consisting of three things: the first one explains how the file systems for Linux were compiled, the second one shows timelines for the releases of Linux Kernel, FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD; the last is a detailed map of the external symbols of the kernel modules analyzed in the second section.

A Visual Expedition Inside the Linux File Systems

How to Read Ext2 / Ext3 File System From Windows Computer

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Data recovery, Debian Linux, Download of the day, Sys admin, Tips, Ubuntu Linux, Windows, Windows server last updated December 19, 2007

This software is must if you dual boot between Linux and Windows laptop / desktop computer.

I’ve already written about Explore2fs and other programs to grant read and write access to Linux ext3 partitions / files from a Windows box. There is a new program called Linux Reader which allows safe and quick access to alternative file systems. This program plays the role of a bridge between your Windows and Ext2/Ext3 Linux file systems. This easy-to-use tool runs under Windows and allows you to browse Ext2/Ext3 Linux file systems and extract files from there. From the project home page:

First of all, DiskInternals Linux Reader is absolutely free. Secondly, the program provides for read-only access and does not allow you to make records in Ext2/Ext3 file system partitions. This guarantees that the interference in an alterative file system will not affect the work of Linux later. Apart from this, it is necessary to note, that it gives you an opportunity to use common Windows Explorer for extracting data. A preview option for pictures is one more pleasant point, which is worth mentioning.

How to Read Ext2 / Ext3 File System From Windows Computer
(Fig 01: Linux Reader in Action under Windows XP [ image credit diskinternals.com ])

Download Linux Reader

=> Download Linux Reader [diskinternals.com]