How to: Upgrade Fedora Linux From 32-bit System to 64-bit Version w/o Reinstalling Server

Posted on in Categories Howto, Links, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Tips last updated January 13, 2008

This small guide may come handy…

From the article:

One great thing about Linux is that you can transplant a hard disk from a machine that runs a 32-bit AMD XP processor into a new 64-bit Intel Core 2 machine, and the Linux installation will continue to work. However, if you do this, you’ll be running a 32-bit kernel, a C library, and a complete system install on a processor that could happily run 64-bit code. You’ll waste even more resources if your new machine has 4GB or more of system memory, and you’ll be forced to either not use some of it or run a 32-bit Physical Address Extension (PAE) kernel. Cross-grading to the 64-bit variant of your Linux distribution can help you use your resources more wisely. A disclaimer: changing the architecture of your Fedora installation from 32 to 64-bit isn’t recommended or supported in any way. Perform this at your own risk after creating a suitable backup.

=> Upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit Fedora Linux without a system reinstall [linux.com]

Download of the day: e tool to extract rpm, rar, zip and other formats under Linux

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Linux last updated July 10, 2007

Sure you can use unzip, unrar, and other tools to extract files under Linux. e is little tool that can extract almost any archive in Linux so you do not need to remember which tool and what command lines are necessary.

You need ruby lanaguage installed on your computer to use this tiny tool. Apart from Ruby, e uses the linux tool file to determine what kind of archive it is dealing with. This tool should be available on any proper Linux installation. Once e knows the archive type, the appropriate extraction tool is executed.

You can read more about this tool, installation and other notes at Martin Ankerl blog.

See also

How do you disconnect inactive user sessions?

Posted on in Categories Ask nixCraft, Linux, Linux distribution, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Shell scripting, Tips, Troubleshooting, Tuning last updated July 6, 2007

One of our regular reader hall sends an interesting question:

I work for a small company and most user login to centralized Linux server. I’d like to
automatically log out all inactive users from server for various reasons. How do I disconnect inactive user sessions?

To be frank, I don’t have any clear cut answer to question. There are at least 4-5 shells installed on a typical Linux installation. Also most user have has control over their own environment and user can switch to a different shell.

I hope our reader or seasoned UNIX admin can help to answer this question. Please share the experiences and advice in the comments.

Update: Checkout answer below in comments!