Linux: 20 Iptables Examples For New SysAdmins

Posted on in Categories Iptables, Linux, Linux distribution, Linux Embedded devices, Linux laptop last updated January 21, 2016

Linux comes with a host based firewall called Netfilter. According to the official project site:

netfilter is a set of hooks inside the Linux kernel that allows kernel modules to register callback functions with the network stack. A registered callback function is then called back for every packet that traverses the respective hook within the network stack.

This Linux based firewall is controlled by the program called iptables to handles filtering for IPv4, and ip6tables handles filtering for IPv6. I strongly recommend that you first read our quick tutorial that explains how to configure a host-based firewall called Netfilter (iptables) under CentOS / RHEL / Fedora / Redhat Enterprise Linux. This post list most common iptables solutions required by a new Linux user to secure his or her Linux operating system from intruders.

Google Announces Linux Kernel Based Chrome OS

Posted on in Categories GNU/Open source, Hardware, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Linux laptop, News, Windows, windows vista last updated July 8, 2009

Google has announced Google Chrome OS, which should be available mid-2010. This is a direct challenge to MS Windows operating systems. This is excellent news and it is going to tied tightly to its Chrome Web browser. Google Chrome running within a new windowing system on top of a Linux kernel. Speed, simplicity and security are the key aspects of Google Chrome OS – said Sundar Pichai, VP Product Management, in a blog post.

Linux Find Out If PCI Hardware Supported or Not In The Current Running Kernel

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, fedora linux, Gentoo Linux, GNU/Open source, Hardware, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Sys admin, Tips last updated June 18, 2009

From my mailbag:

How do I find out if a given PCI hardware is supported of by the current CentOS / Debian / RHEL / Fedora Linux kernel?

You can easily find out find out if a given piece of PCI hardware such as RAID, network, sound, graphics card is supported or not by the current Linux kernel using the following utilities under any Linux distributions.

Security Update: Debian Linux Kernel Local / Remote Vulnerabilities

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, kernel, Linux distribution, Security Alert last updated December 6, 2008

Debian project today released a pair of security updates to plug at least ten security holes in its core called Linux kernel. Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a denial of service or privilege escalation. This update has been rated as having important security impact.

GNU/GCC Compiler Techniques Used in Linux Kernel

Posted on in Categories C Programming, GNU/Open source, Howto, Linux last updated November 21, 2008

Excellent article – you can find information about GCC extensions for the C language. The Linux kernel uses several special capabilities of the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) suite. These capabilities range from giving you shortcuts and simplifications to providing the compiler with hints for optimization.

This article provides a glimpse of the techniques made available by GCC in the Linux kernel. You can read more about all the available extensions for both C and C++ in the GNU GCC manual.

Linux Supports More Devices Than Any Other OS

Posted on in Categories GNU/Open source, Hardware, kernel, Linux, News last updated November 3, 2008

Interesting read and claim has been independently verified by somebody from Microsoft.

Greg Kroah-Hartman is a longtime developer of the Linux kernel, known for his work maintaining USB drivers as well as for packaging the SUSE kernel at Novell. O’Reilly Media recently interviewed Greg about his claim that the Linux kernel now supports more devices than any other operating system ever has, as well as why binary-only drivers are illegal, and how the kernel development process works.

Read full interview: How Linux Supports More Devices Than Any Other OS, Ever