How To Avoid Sudden Outburst Of Backup Shell Script or Program Disk I/O on Linux

Posted on in Categories High performance computing, kernel, Linux, Storage, Troubleshooting, Tuning last updated December 16, 2015

A sudden outburst of violent disk I/O activity can bring down your email or web server. Usually, a web, mysql, or mail server serving millions and millions pages (requests) per months are prone to this kind of problem. Backup activity can increase current system load too. To avoid this kind of sudden outburst problem, run your script with scheduling class and priority. Linux comes with various utilities to manage this kind of madness.

Who Writes Linux – Insight Into Individual Linux Kernel Contributors

Posted on in Categories Linux, News last updated April 2, 2008

A report from the Linux Foundation details individual kernel contributions and suggests enterprise use is expanding. However there is elite group inside community. During the past three years, the top 10 individual developers have contributed nearly 15 per cent of the changes to the kernel, while the top 30 developers have submitted 30 per cent, the report states.

Al Viro, David S. Miller and Adrian Bunk authored most of the patches; Andrew Morton came in fifth. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, is found far down on the list. Viro has contributed 1,571 changes to the kernel, which sits at the core of the Linux operating system, over the past three years.

According to Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation:

Never before in the history of computing have there been so many companies, users and developers united behind one project, specifically one that has seen so much commercial success.

Some interesting facts about Linux kernel

Who is Writing Linux?

  • Every Linux kernel is being developed by nearly 1,000 developers working for more than 100 different corporations.

Who is Sponsoring Linux?

  • More than 70 percent of total contributions to the kernel come from developers working at a range of companies including IBM, Intel, The Linux Foundation, MIPS Technology, MontaVista, Movial, NetApp, Novell and Red Hat.

How Fast is Linux Developed and Released?

  • An average of 3,621 lines of code are added to the kernel tree every day, and a new kernel is released approximately every 2.7 months.

=> Linux Foundation Publishes Study on Linux Development Statistics: Who Writes Linux and Who Supports It

How To Build Secure and Portable Linux Based System

Posted on in Categories Hardware, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Security last updated March 18, 2008

Interesting idea that explains how to build awesome secure and portable system using Linux. From the article:

I designed this system with both security and portability in mind. My system uses a Linux kernel and the entire thing, applications, personal data, etc, takes up 1GB of space. It is split up into two parts, the operating system, and my personal data. The operating system is a 700MB live-CD, GRML, that generates a completely fresh install every single time I boot up the computer. Doing this means that if my system is ever hacked into, a simple restart of my computer fixes the problem. This also means that any configuration changes made or private information stored by any application, restarting reverts everything to a clean slate.

The personal data is encrypted using an AES-256 algorithm. The password I type in actually unlocks a special encrypted file which unlocks the real encryption information, meaning that my actual password is never stored in RAM (more specifically, DRAM). To prevent highly sensitive information from being discovered by remote hackers, which this layer of encryption would not protect against, an extra layer of encryption using either GPG or AES-256 provides two layers of encryption for highly sensitive data.

=> My Awesome Secure and Portable System