Linux: 25 PHP Security Best Practices For Sys Admins

Posted on in Categories php, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Sys admin, Tuning last updated March 28, 2016

PHP is an open-source server-side scripting language, and it is a widely used. The Apache/Nginx/Lighttpd web server provides access to files and content via the HTTP OR HTTPS protocol. A misconfigured server-side scripting language can create all sorts of problems. So, PHP should be used with caution. Here are twenty-five php security best practices for sysadmins for configuring PHP securely.

News Roundup

Posted on in Categories Linux, News, UNIX last updated January 21, 2008

=> KDE 4 Review : Ars Technica reviews KDE 4.0 – KDE 4.0 was officially released last week after extensive development. The long-awaited 4.0 release ushers in a new era for the popular open-source desktop environment and adds many intriguing new features and technologies. Unfortunately, the release comes with almost as many new bugs as it does features, and there is much work to be done before it sparkles like the 3.5.x series.

=> Humor : Intelligent atheist white man seeks sweetie // Help me keep the shell people alive

=> Every aspect of computer users’ lives — from their heartbeat to a guilty smile — could be monitored and immediately analysed under the futuristic system detailed in Microsoft’s patent application.

=> Asus Launches Windows Version of its Eee PC – Hackers no longer have to resort to their own devices to get Windows on Asus’s Eee PC.

=> Crispin Cowan, the Linux security expert behind StackGard, the Immunix Linux distro and AppArmor, has joined the Windows security team.

Howto: Redhat Enterprise Linux SELinux policy guide

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Howto, Linux, Linux distribution, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Sys admin, Troubleshooting, Tuning last updated December 18, 2007

Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux) is a Linux mandatory access controls, through the use of Linux Security Modules (LSM) in the Linux kernel. SELinux is enabled by default in RHEL 5 / CentOS 5 / Fedora etc. But many admin disabled it due to troubles and hard configuration options. So if you are afraid of SELinux, try new GUI tools to customizing your system’s protection by creating new policy modules is easier than ever. In this article, Dan Walsh gently walks you through the policy module creation process:

A lot of people think that building a new SELinux policy is magic, but magic tricks never seem quite as difficult once you know how they’re done. This article explains how I build a policy module and gives you the step-by-step process for using the tools to build your own.

=> A step-by-step guide to building a new SELinux policy module