Installing VMWARE server on CentOS 5 or Red hat enterprise Linux 64 bit version

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Tips, Troubleshooting last updated July 9, 2007

VMware virtualization software is an excllent choice for x86-compatible computers. They have both commercial and free version. I received few email regarding VMWARE on 64 bit Linux. Installing VMWARE server on CentOS 5 or Red hat enterprise Linux 64 bit version is a tricky business. In this small howto I will explain vmware installation on 64 bit Linux server without facing any dependencies problem.

Following instructions are tested on both RHEL 5 and CentOS 5 running 64 bit Intel / AMD hardware and software. My kernel:
$ uname -mrs
Output:

Linux 2.6.18-8.1.6.el5 x86_64

My RHEL 5 release (same kernel for CentOS):
$ cat /etc/redhat-release
Output:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 5 (Tikanga)

Make sure you have following software installed:

  • Full gcc compiler and development environment
  • Kernel headers and devel packages for current kernel (i.e. kernel-headers and kernel-devel)

Continue reading “Installing VMWARE server on CentOS 5 or Red hat enterprise Linux 64 bit version”

How do you disconnect inactive user sessions?

Posted on in Categories Ask nixCraft, Linux, Linux distribution, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Shell scripting, Tips, Troubleshooting, Tuning last updated July 6, 2007

One of our regular reader hall sends an interesting question:

I work for a small company and most user login to centralized Linux server. I’d like to
automatically log out all inactive users from server for various reasons. How do I disconnect inactive user sessions?

To be frank, I don’t have any clear cut answer to question. There are at least 4-5 shells installed on a typical Linux installation. Also most user have has control over their own environment and user can switch to a different shell.

I hope our reader or seasoned UNIX admin can help to answer this question. Please share the experiences and advice in the comments.

Update: Checkout answer below in comments!

nixCraft FAQ Roundup June 19, 2007

Posted on in Categories FAQ last updated June 19, 2007

Recently updated/posted Linux and UNIX FAQ (mostly useful to Linux/UNIX new administrators or users) :

nixCraft FAQ Roundup – Dec 8, 2008

Posted on in Categories FAQ last updated December 8, 2006

Recently updated/posted Linux and UNIX FAQ:

=> Boot Ubuntu Linux into Rescue mode to fix system – How do I boot my Ubuntu Linux server into Rescue mode to fix system?

=> Unable to create installation source – Add directories into YaST as an installation source – I have created my own patch files on the hard drive. How do I add all those directories into Suse Linux YaST as an installation source?

=> How to uninstall GRUB – How do I uninstall GRUB using old good MS-DOS fdisk or Linux/UNIX dd command?

=> Can I run fsck or e2fsck when Linux file system is mounted? Can I run run fsck/e2fsc on a live Linux file system?

=> Configure Sendmail SSL encryption for sending and receiving email – Configure Sendmail MTA to use SSL encryption for sending/receiving email using valid SSL certificate.

=> Linux configure Network Address Translation or NAT – Old good Linux NAT!

=> Use sudo or sudoers to start, stop & restart Apache – Sudo to stop and/or restart Apache web server!

=> How to install firefox-2.0.tar.gz in Linux – I have downloaded firefox file from mozilla web site to my Linux desktop system. The name of file is firefox-2.0.tar.gz. How do I install firefox-2.0.tar.gz in Fedora Core Linux?

Enjoy!

Linux Display Bandwidth Usage on Network Interface By Host Using iftop command

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, Networking, RedHat/Fedora Linux last updated May 7, 2017

The iftop command listens to network traffic on a named network interface, or on the first interface, it can find which looks like an external interface if none is specified, and displays a table of current bandwidth usage by pairs of hosts. The iftop is a perfect tool for remote Linux server over an ssh based session.

How to: Allow Any User To Shutdown a Linux Server

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, FreeBSD, Gentoo Linux, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Sys admin, Tips, Ubuntu Linux last updated February 23, 2006

You need to use the sudo command to grant a permission to other users to shutdown your server. The sudo command allows a permitted user to execute a command as the superuser or another user, as specified in the /etc/sudoers file. Login as a root user and type the visudo command to edit the sudoers file.