How to: Sync BlackBerry with Linux Desktop

Posted on in Categories Hardware, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux phone, Networking, Ubuntu Linux last updated December 22, 2007

The BlackBerry is a wireless handheld which I used mainly for office e-mail, telephone, text messaging and other wireless information services. Joe has published some interesting information about syncing BlackBerry on Linux:
If you use Linux on your desktop, and you also happen to have a BlackBerry handheld device, you’re probably aware that Research in Motion, the company that develops the BlackBerry platform, offers nothing in the way of support for its devices on Linux — but the intrepid geeks in the free software world do.

How to: Sync BlackBerry with Ubuntu Linux Desktop

Thanks to to the efforts of the Barry and OpenSync projects, I just finished syncing my BlackBerry 8800 with my Evolution contacts on my Ubuntu 7.10 desktop.

If all you want to do is share data between your Linux box and the BlackBerry, no sweat. The 2GB Micro SD storage I inserted in my 8800 is available to my Linux system just like any other USB storage device. When I connect the USB cable to the BlackBerry, I simply say yes when Ubuntu asks if I want to enter Mass Storage Mode, and I can copy music and photos to the phone. I have run into a problem getting the audio for videos that were created with Kino to work correctly, but other than that, moving data back and forth between the PDA and the desktop “just works.”

=> Syncing your BlackBerry on Linux

Download advanced Linux programming book PDF version

Posted on in Categories C Programming, Download of the day, GNU/Open source, Howto, Links, Open source coding last updated December 16, 2007

If you are a developer for the GNU/Linux system, this book will help you to write and/or develop GNU/Linux software that works the way users expect it to.

Advanced Linux Programming is published under the Open Publication License, Version 1, no options exercised. (Due to an oversight in final production, the copyright notice on the book is incorrect.) The full text may be downloaded from this site. Code samples in the book are covered by the GNU General Public License and are also available.

Topics

Chapter 01 – Advanced Unix Programming with Linux
Chapter 02 – Writing Good GNU/Linux Software
Chapter 03 – Processes
Chapter 04 – Threads
Chapter 05 – Interprocess Communication
Chapter 06 – Mastering Linux
Chapter 07 – The /proc File System
Chapter 08 – Linux System Calls
Chapter 09 – Inline Assembly Code
Chapter 10 – Security
Chapter 11 – A Sample GNU/Linux Application

Download link

=> Advanced Linux programming book, by Mark Mitchell, Jeffrey Oldham, Alex Samuel (via Digg)