Will OpenSolaris repeat the Linux success again?

Posted on in Categories Solaris, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated July 17, 2007

Project Indiana is a new project to create an OpenSolaris binary distribution. This distribution will focus on providing a single CD install with the basic core operating system and desktop environment, with the opportunity of installing additional software off network repositories just like Ubuntu Linux.

This is a new project from Sun. The main aim is make OpenSolaris an easy to use UNIX:

The distribution will showcase much of the work continuing in the OpenSolaris community and the best of breed open source software available within other open source communities. Moverover, the distribution will include work that closes the familiarity gap with existing GNU/Linux users eg. install and packaging.

Project Indiana will be a leading edge distribution with an expected adoption of OpenSolaris enthusiasts and developers on single user systems and basic server setups. It will also encourage new users coming to the platform for the first time.

According to Ian Murdock’s Weblog:

Like Linux, OpenSolaris is a kernel. Except that it’s more than a kernel. Or, rather, more than a kernel but not quite a complete operating system. Are you confused yet?

Ian is 100% right and suggests ways to improve OpenSolaris. In short Sun’s new project trying to turn OpenSolaris into a practical distributions, you can download OpenSolaris just like Ubuntu and use it like a pro. Now the million dollar question ~ Can OpenSolaris make Sun shine again?

Read more: Sun’s Project Indiana: turning OpenSolaris into a practical platform

Linux device driver tutorial using kernel driver frameworks

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, Open source coding last updated July 5, 2007

A device driver is computer program allowing other computer programs to interact with a computer hardware device. Writing a Linux device driver is considered as a black art by many. If you ever been tempted to try writing a device driver, this howto will serve as a kick start guide:

For many seasoned Linux developers, device drivers still remain a bit of a mysterious black art practiced by a select few. While no single article could possibly attempt to covered everything there is to know about writing drivers, Valerie Henson gives us a brief taste of what’s involved, by implementing a device to return “Hello World” using all the major driver frameworks.

On a related note if you just want get a comprehensive overview of kernel configuration and building, a critical task for Linux users and administrators, try Linux Kernel in a Nutshell

/dev/hello_world: A Simple Introduction to Device Drivers under Linux (linuxdevcenter.com)