ss: Display Linux TCP / UDP Network and Socket Information

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, Howto, Linux, Monitoring, Networking, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Sys admin, Tips, Troubleshooting, Ubuntu Linux last updated June 2, 2009

The ss command is used to show socket statistics. It can display stats for PACKET sockets, TCP sockets, UDP sockets, DCCP sockets, RAW sockets, Unix domain sockets, and more. It allows showing information similar to netstat command. It can display more TCP and state information than other tools. It is a new, incredibly useful and faster (as compare to netstat) tool for tracking TCP connections and sockets. SS can provide information about:

  • All TCP sockets.
  • All UDP sockets.
  • All established ssh / ftp / http / https connections.
  • All local processes connected to X server.
  • Filtering by state (such as connected, synchronized, SYN-RECV, SYN-SENT,TIME-WAIT), addresses and ports.
  • All the tcp sockets in state FIN-WAIT-1 and much more.

Firewall Builder: Convert Linux Iptables Configuration to OpenBSD and PF

Posted on in Categories Iptables, Linux, OpenBSD, Security last updated March 25, 2009

Lets see how much effort it is going to take to convert this configuration to entirely different firewall platform – PF on OpenBSD. There are different ways to do this. I could make a copy of each member firewall (linux-test-1 and linux-test-2), set platform and host OS in the copy to PF and OpenBSD and then create new cluster object. This would be a sensible way because it preserves old objects which helps to roll back in case something does not work out. However, to make the explanation shorter, I am going to make the changes in place by modifying existing objects.

Linux Proves – The Best Things In Life Are Free

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop, RedHat/Fedora Linux last updated March 16, 2009

They say – there’s no such thing as a free lunch. But, Linux and FOSS software can be used to start, run and grow your business for, you guessed it, free. February survey of IT managers by IDC indicated that hard times are accelerating the adoption of Linux. The open source operating system will emerge from the recession in a stronger data center position than before, concluded an IDC white paper.

Missing Memory

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Sys admin, Troubleshooting, UNIX, Windows server last updated March 13, 2009

Today, I’ve upgraded total 8 servers from 4GiB to 8GiB to improve performance of system by inserting additional memory modules. We started each server and checked for memory count at console. All severs booted normally after the upgrade and services such as SMTP, NFS, CIFS, HTTP started as expected. Shortly, afterwords I got a call from help desk about pop3 server for slow performance.

Debunking the "Linux is virus free" Myth

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Shell scripting, Ubuntu Linux, Windows, windows vista last updated February 11, 2009

Is Linux is virus free? The author of foobar blog provides some insight about the same. Linux users can’t just catch a virus by email or downloading malware from the Internet, contrary to “those Windows users”. From the foobar blog post:

Then you save an email attachment under Linux, the execute flag is normally NOT set and thus, the file can’t be executed just by clicking on it. So, no luck?

Linux Memory Management – Understanding a Program in Memory

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux last updated January 27, 2009

Excellent article! It explains how programs are laid out in memory.

From the blog post:

Memory management is the heart of operating systems; it is crucial for both programming and system administration. In the next few posts I’ll cover memory with an eye towards practical aspects, but without shying away from internals. While the concepts are generic, examples are mostly from Linux and Windows on 32-bit x86. This first post describes how programs are laid out in memory. Each process in a multi-tasking OS runs in its own memory sandbox. This sandbox is the virtual address space, which in 32-bit mode is always a 4GB block of memory addresses.

=> Anatomy of a Program in Memory

Linux Convert ext3 to ext4 File system

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Data recovery, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Storage, Suse Linux, Sys admin, Tips, Troubleshooting, Tuning, Ubuntu Linux last updated January 23, 2009

Some time ago ext4 was released and available for Linux kernel. ext4 provides some additional benefits and perforce over ext3 file system. You can easily convert ext3 to ext4 file system. The next release of Fedora, 11, will default to the ext4 file system unless serious regressions are seen. In this quick tutorial you will learn about converting ext3 to ext4 file system.

XEN Virtualization Set The MTU For xenbr0 Interface

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, fedora linux, Gentoo Linux, High performance computing, kernel, Linux, Linux Virtualization, Networking, RedHat/Fedora Linux, xen last updated December 31, 2008

I’ve already written about setting the MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) under Linux including Jumbo frames (FreeBSD specific MTU information is here).

With this quick tip you can increase MTU size to get a better networking performance.