Ubuntu Linux Getting Ready For Average User

Posted on in Categories Linux desktop, Ubuntu Linux last updated April 17, 2008

The latest beta of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution offers updated features and good support for new Linux user. It appears that Ubuntu is getting ready for masses. From the article:

If there is a single complaint that is laid at the feet of Linux time and time again, it’s that the operating system is too complicated and arcane for casual computer users to tolerate. You can’t ask newbies to install device drivers or recompile the kernel, naysayers argue.

Of course, many of those criticisms date back to the bad old days, but Ubuntu, the user-friendly distribution sponsored by Mark Shuttleworth’s Canonical Ltd., has made a mission out of dispelling such complaints entirely.

Increase Your Productivity with Various Linux Desktop Apps

Posted on in Categories Links, Linux, Linux desktop, Ubuntu Linux, windows vista last updated April 1, 2008

This blog post covers many applications which can be used to increase your productivity without spending a single penny.

From the article:

Sure, Apple’s built its reputation on being the hipster brand of choice, but one of the nice things about Linux is the ability to customize virtually any aspect of the operating system to cater to your workflow and computing habits.

For the purpose of structure I’ll break the article into two parts. The first will discuss how Linux can be just as application-rich, in terms of usefulness, as OS X or Windows. In the second half, I’ll cover various productivity-boosting apps and features that allow you do accomplish virtually any task with a few simple keystrokes.

=> Full-throttle Productivity and Web-Work With Ubuntu

History and Culture of Unix Programming – The Art of Unix Programming

Posted on in Categories C Programming, Download of the day, FreeBSD, Linux, UNIX last updated March 27, 2008

The Art of Unix Programming by Eric Raymond is a book about the history and culture of Unix programming from its earliest days in 1969 to now, covering both genetic derivations such as BSD and conceptual ones such as Linux.

You should read this book if you are an experienced Unix programmer who is often in the position of either educating novice programmers or debating partisans of other operating systems, and you find it hard to articulate the benefits of the Unix approach.

You should read this book if you are a C, C++, or Java programmer with experience on other operating systems and you are about to start a Unix-based project.

You should read this book if you are a Unix user with novice-level up to middle-level skills in the operating system, but little development experience, and want to learn how to design software effectively under Unix.

You can read HTML version of “The Art of Unix Programming” online at Eric’s website.

How To Build Secure and Portable Linux Based System

Posted on in Categories Hardware, Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Security last updated March 18, 2008

Interesting idea that explains how to build awesome secure and portable system using Linux. From the article:

I designed this system with both security and portability in mind. My system uses a Linux kernel and the entire thing, applications, personal data, etc, takes up 1GB of space. It is split up into two parts, the operating system, and my personal data. The operating system is a 700MB live-CD, GRML, that generates a completely fresh install every single time I boot up the computer. Doing this means that if my system is ever hacked into, a simple restart of my computer fixes the problem. This also means that any configuration changes made or private information stored by any application, restarting reverts everything to a clean slate.

The personal data is encrypted using an AES-256 algorithm. The password I type in actually unlocks a special encrypted file which unlocks the real encryption information, meaning that my actual password is never stored in RAM (more specifically, DRAM). To prevent highly sensitive information from being discovered by remote hackers, which this layer of encryption would not protect against, an extra layer of encryption using either GPG or AES-256 provides two layers of encryption for highly sensitive data.

=> My Awesome Secure and Portable System

Install and Run Debian Linux from an Encrypted USB Drive

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, File system, Hardware, Howto, Linux last updated February 20, 2008

Another interesting article with security in mind. From the article:

You’re probably familiar with the live CD concept — a fully functional operating system on a CD that can be run on any computer that boots from its optical drive, without affecting the one(s) already installed. In a similar vein, you can set up Linux to run from a USB hard drive drive on any computer that can boot from USB. The live system offers automatic detection and configuration of the display adapter and screen, storage devices, and other peripherals. A bootable USB drive can run a mainstream Linux distribution such as Debian GNU/Linux, and can be secured, personalised, upgraded, and otherwise modified to suit your needs.

=> Running Debian GNU/Linux from an encrypted USB drive

Linus Torvalds on Linux Desktop Operating System

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop last updated February 8, 2008

Don Reisinger wonders – if Linus Torvalds even speaking for Linux anymore:

Even though Linus Torvalds has always been known as a deity-like figure in the world of Linux, lately he has been quite outspoken about where he thinks his operating system is going and what its competitors are doing wrong.

Wired blog has published Linus Torvalds thoughts on why users aren’t flocking to Linux:

As always there’s a laundry list of things Torvalds doesn’t care about — Open Solaris and Sun, for instance — but his thoughts on the future of the Linux desktop are interesting, including this bit: “I have never, ever cared about really anything but the Linux desktop.”

You can read Linus Torvalds thoughts on the Linux desktop and its broader adoption here.

Upgrading Ubuntu Linux 7.04 to Gutsy Gibbon 7.10

Posted on in Categories Ubuntu Linux last updated October 16, 2007

Yup, the latest, greatest and cutting edge Ubuntu Linux 7.10 is here.. I’m upgrading my box 🙂

Type the following command to start upgrade procedure:
$ sudo update-manager -c -d

Upgrading Ubuntu Linux to 7.10

Just follow on screen instructions. Refer upgrading from Ubuntu 7.04 to 7.10 for more information.

I’m just going to open full up 2mbps pipe for my desktop so it can pull all the upgrades quickly.

PC-BSD review

Posted on in Categories FreeBSD last updated November 12, 2006
FreeBSD logo

PC-BSD is a Unix-like, desktop-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD.
The main aim is to be easy to install programs by using a graphical installation program, KDE – pre-installed graphical user interface.

PC-BSD does not use ports style package management, instead it use .pbi files. You can just double click on .pbi file to start installation wizard (just like Windows XP).

From the article:
Well, I thought it was about time I got around to doing this properly.

I’ve been using PC-BSD for approx. 10 Months so I’ve had enough time to see what life throws at me with it. My first install was 1.0 Release Canadate (RC) 1 and I currently run PC-BSD 1.2 (the current release) on my laptop and have a beta version of 1.3 installed on my desktop for testing. This will cover PC-BSD 1.2 and PC-BSD in general.

PC-BSD is primarly for desktops but makes a darn good laptop/workstation system. I won’t cover installation details as this is changing in future versions and often reviewed. My reviews sole interest is in a End User perspective.

Read more

HowTo: Flashing Your System BIOS Under Linux

Posted on in Categories Hardware, Howto, Linux last updated August 31, 2006

The BIOS is Basic Input/Output System used by a computer, which embedded on a chip on a computer’s motherboard. It is used to controls various devices connected to your computer. When you turn on the computer, the BIOS starts up and perform a Power-On Self Test (POST). The BIOS will check all devices connected to your computer such as the CPU, RAM, the video card, the sound card and so on. Once the post test has