FAQ Updates: Dec/22/2011

Posted on in Categories Sys admin last updated December 21, 2011

Our FAQ section is updated in last few days with new howto:

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Download Of The Day: Ubuntu Linux 8.04 (Hardy) Beta ISO / CD

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Ubuntu Linux last updated March 24, 2008

The Ubuntu project has released beta version 8.04 and available for download from the official project web site.
The Ubuntu developers are moving very quickly to bring you the absolute latest and greatest software the open source community has to offer. New feature includes:

+ GNOME 2.22

+ Linux kernel 2.6.24.

+ Firefox 3 beta

+ PulseAudio

+ Vinagre VNC client

+ Brasero CD/DVD burning application

+ There is a new installation option for Windows users. Wubi allows users to install and uninstall Ubuntu like any other Windows application. It does not require a dedicated partition, nor does it affect the existing bootloader, yet users can experience a dual-boot setup almost identical to a full installation.

The final stable version will be released in April 2008. Download cutting edge version from official mirror.

Shell Script: Create Linux Bootable USB Sticks

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux distribution, Perl last updated February 27, 2008

This may come handy, from the project page:

Mk-boot-usb is a perl script to create multiple-bootable usb sticks (usb keys / usb flash drives). It wipes out an entire usb stick, partitions it, creates file systems on it, installs grub, and installs a minimal linux on it. Mk-boot-usb is meant to speed up and lower the barrier of entry for creating bootable usb sticks. The usb stick will immediately become bootable (using the minimal linux), and more useful distributions can then be installed into other partitions manually simply by (1) copying any Live CD into each partition (2) modifying grub’s configuration file.

=> Mk-boot-usb: a Script to Create Multiple-Bootable USB Sticks

Related: How to Create Bootable Linux CD

How to add Windows TrueType fonts easily in Linux desktop system

Posted on in Categories Howto, Linux desktop, News, Windows last updated November 15, 2006

How do you use Windows True Type fonts in Linux or how do you install Windows TrueType fonts in Linux? – A typical newbie question.

Fonts are very important. When you migrate from Windows XP to Linux you may miss Truetype font. TrueType is a font standard developed by Apple Computer. By 1991 Microsoft had built TrueType into the Windows 3.1 operating system. The FreeType project provides TrueType under Linux. So let us see how to backup your Windows TrueType fonts and install them in Linux.

It is quite easy to add Windows True Type fonts in Linux. First make sure you copy Windows fonts on USB pen (usually located in C:\Windows\Fonts directory) or just mount windows NTFS/FAT partition. You can copy selected or all fonts from C:\Windows\Fonts directory.

Linux Gnome desktop

=> Open your default file manger or double click Computer icon on Gnome desktop
=> Type url:
fonts://
Alternatively, select Open Location? from file menu and type
fonts://
=> Once window open, just drag and drop fonts into this new windows from USB pen or mounted partition. Don’t forget to restart application or just logout and login again.

Novell Suse Linux

  • Novell Suse Linux has Font installer.
  • Open Font installer from System administration option located on gecko menu > Personal settings
  • Provide root password when prompted
  • Click on Add fonts button
  • Now install fonts from USB pen or mounted Windows Partition
  • Save changes
  • Don’t forget to restart your desktop (just logout and login again)

How to mount remote windows partition (windows share) under Linux

Posted on in Categories CentOS, File system, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Suse Linux, Sys admin, Tip of the day, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX, Windows, Windows server last updated April 26, 2004

All files accessible in a Linux (and UNIX) system are arranged in one big tree, the file hierarchy, rooted at /. These files can be spread out over several devices. The mount command serves to attach the file system found on some device to the big file tree.

Use the mount command to mount remote windows partition or windows share under Linux as follows:

Procedure to mount remote windows partition (NAS share)

1) Make sure you have following information:
==> Windows username and password to access share name
==> Sharename (such as //server/share) or IP address
==> root level access on Linux

2) Login to Linux as a root user (or use su command)

3) Create the required mount point:
# mkdir -p /mnt/ntserver
4) Use the mount command as follows:
# mount -t cifs //ntserver/download -o username=vivek,password=myPassword /mnt/ntserver

Use following command if you are using Old version such as RHEL <=4 or Debian <= 3: # mount -t smbfs -o username=vivek,password=D1W4x9sw //ntserver/download /mnt/ntserver

5) Access Windows 2003/2000/NT share using cd and ls command:
# cd /mnt/ntserver; ls -l
Where,

  • -t smbfs : File system type to be mount (outdated, use cifs)
  • -t cifs : File system type to be mount
  • -o : are options passed to mount command, in this example I had passed two options. First argument is password (vivek) and second argument is password to connect remote windows box
  • //ntserver/download : Windows 2000/NT share name
  • /mnt/ntserver Linux mount point (to access share after mounting)

See also:

Updated for accuracy on Aug-8-2007, 8:19PM.