Download of the day: Linux Kernel 2.6.25

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Linux last updated April 17, 2008

Linux kernel 2.6.25 has been released and available for download from the official website. After nearly three months of development and the merging of over 12,000 patches from almost 1200 developers, this kernel is now considered ready for wider use. Highlights of this release include the ath5k (Atheros wireless) driver, a bunch of realtime work including realtime group scheduling, preemptable RCU, LatencyTop support, a number of new ext4 filesystem features, support for the controller area network protocol, more network namespace work and much more. LWN has more information.

Related: How To Compile Linux kernel 2.6.xx.

Download of the day: Linux kernel 2.6.24

Posted on in Categories Download of the day, Linux last updated January 25, 2008

The Linux kernel version 2.6.24 has been released and available for download. From the announcement:

The release is out there (both git trees and as tarballs/patches), and for the next week many kernel developers will be at (or flying into/out of) LCA in Melbourne, so let’s hope it’s a good one. Nothing earth-shattering happened since -rc8, although the new set of ACPI blacklist entries and some network driver updates makes the diffstat show that there was more than the random sprinkling of one-liners all over the tree.

Download Linux kernel 2.6.24

=> Visit official kernel website to grab latest version. You may find our kernel compiling instructions useful.

Skype outage due to bad log-in mechanisms

Posted on in Categories Beyond nixCraft, High performance computing, Networking last updated August 20, 2007

On 16th August 2007, the Skype peer-to-peer network became unstable and suffered a critical disruption. According to official blog post it was windows update service:

The disruption was triggered by a massive restart of our users’ computers across the globe within a very short timeframe as they re-booted after receiving a routine set of patches through Windows Update.

The high number of restarts affected Skype’s network resources. This caused a flood of log-in requests, which, combined with the lack of peer-to-peer network resources, prompted a chain reaction that had a critical impact.

There was also news about some Russian crackers brought down the service. Skype has denied this rumor and assured that no malicious activities were attributed or users’ security was in danger, at any point.

This incident clearly provides few hints:
(a) Microsoft dominates PC desktop market.
(b) Application code can bring down entire network, so always consider HA ( High-Availability networking and storage) along with app code
(c) Skype does not blame Microsoft. It was their own code