Ksplice: Upgrade / Patch Your Linux Kernel Without Reboots

Posted on in Categories Linux last updated November 9, 2016

Generally, all Linux distributions needs a scheduled reboot once to stay up to date with important kernel security updates. RHN (or other distro vendors) provides Linux kernel security updates. You can apply kernel updates using yum command or apt-get command line options. After each upgrade you need to reboot the server. Ksplice service allows you to skip reboot step and apply hotfixes to kernel without rebooting the server. In this post, I will cover a quick installation of Ksplice for RHEL 5.x and try to find out if service is worth every penny.

Reboot Linux box after a kernel panic

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, Gentoo Linux, Hardware, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Tips, Troubleshooting, Tuning last updated November 16, 2007

If you want the server to get rebooted automatically after kernel hit by a pain error message, try adding panic=N to /etc/sysctl.conf file.

It specify kernel behavior on panic. By default, the kernel will not reboot after a panic, but this option will cause a kernel reboot after N seconds. For example following boot parameter will force to reboot Linux after 10 seconds.
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Linux Disable the Ctrl-Alt-Delete shutdown keys

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, Gentoo Linux, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Suse Linux, Sys admin, Tips, Troubleshooting, Ubuntu Linux last updated September 13, 2007

On a production system it is recommended that you disable the [Ctrl]-[Alt]-[Delete] shutdown. It is configured using /etc/inittab (used by sysv-compatible init process) file. The inittab file describes which processes are started at bootup and during normal operation. You need to open this file and remove (or comment it) ctrlaltdel entry.

Ctrlaltdel specifies the process that will be executed when init receives the SIGINT signal. SIGINT is the symbolic name for the signal thrown by computer programs when a user wishes to interrupt the process, for example reboot/shutdown system using [Ctrl]-[Alt]-[Del].). This means that someone on the system console has pressed the CTRL-ALT-DEL key combination. Typically one wants to execute some sort of shutdown either to get into single-user level or to reboot the machine.

Disable CTRL+ALT+Del keys

Open /etc/inittab file, enter:
# vi /etc/inittab

Search for line that read as follows:
ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now

And remove the line or comment out the above line by putting a hash mark (#) in front of it:
# ca:12345:ctrlaltdel:/sbin/shutdown -t1 -a -r now

Save the file and exit to shell promot. Reboot system to take effect or type command:
# init q

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Re-read The Partition Table Without Rebooting Linux System

Posted on in Categories File system, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Sys admin, Tips, Troubleshooting, Ubuntu Linux last updated July 17, 2016

If you are using hot swappable hard disk and created new partition using fdisk then you need to reboot Linux based system to get partition recognized. Without reboot you will NOT able to create filesystem on your newly created or modified partitions with the mke2fs command.

However with partprobe command you should able to create a new file system without rebooting the box. It is a program that informs the operating system kernel of partition table changes, by requesting that the operating system re-read the partition table.