How to: Upgrade Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) to latest Releases 5.1

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Howto, Linux distribution, Linux Virtualization, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Sys admin, Tips last updated November 8, 2007

RHEL 5.1 has been released. Redhat announced the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.1, with integrated virtualization. This release provides the most compelling platform for customers and software developers ever, with its industry-leading virtualization capabilities complementing Red Hat’s newly announced Linux Automation strategy. It offers the industry’s broadest deployment ecosystem, covering standalone systems, virtualized systems, appliances and web-scale “cloud” computing environments.

Besides supporting Linux virtual machines, RHEL 5.1 will also support Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003 and the forthcoming Windows 2008, Crenshaw said. RHEL 5.1 uses Xen for its virtualization.

How do I upgrade to RHEL 5.1?

Login as the root user and simply type the command to fetch all updates via RHN:
# yum update
Depend upon your network condition and software configuration it may take anywhere between 5-20 minutes. Once completed, just reboot the server:
# reboot
Verify that everything is working fine:
# netstat -tulpn
# netstat -nat
# tail -f /var/log/messages
# egrep -i 'error|warn' /var/log/messages
# egrep -i 'error|warn' /path/to/apps/log

Community driven enterprise CentOS Linux users should expect update soon too. You can apply above commends to upgrade your CentOS box.

How to: OpenBSD reset root password

Posted on in Categories OpenBSD, Sys admin, Tips last updated September 19, 2007

If you forgot your root password, you can simply reset it. The general procedure for resetting password is as follows (if you are a Linux user, see how to reset Linux root password):

a) At boot> prompt force openbsd to boot into a single user mode

b) Next mount file system in read-write mode

c) Run passwd command

d) Sync file system

e) Reboot and login normally.

Procedure to reset root password

At boot> prompt type boot -s to boot into single user mode:
boot> boot -s
Next you will see a message as follows:

Enter pathname of shell or RETURN for sh:

Just hit [Enter] key to load sh shell.
Next mount / and /usr file system in read-write mode:
# mount -uw /
# mount /usr

Finally set or change the password for root user, enter:
# passwd
Press CTRL+D to boot into multiuser mode or just reboot server:
# reboot

Further reading

Howto: Shutdown Linux Box Automatically

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, Gentoo Linux, Howto, Linux, Suse Linux, Sys admin, Tips, UNIX last updated October 2, 2005

You may wonder – why should I shutdown the Linux box box automatically? It depends upon your situation. For example, your downloading couple of tar balls and you want to go home. You can schedule a job to shutdown Linux after downloading is completed. Linux/UNIX/BSD/OS X comes with at and cron commands to automate task. Almost all common task can be automated using at command.