FreeBSD portupgrade /usr/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/portsdb.rb:567:in open_db: database file error

Posted on in Categories FreeBSD, Howto, Troubleshooting, UNIX last updated December 13, 2007

The portupgrade command is used to upgrade installed packages via ports or packages. This is one of the tool you need to use under FreeBSD. However, recently, it give me out following error on FreeBSD r6.2-p10-amd64 bit:

missing key: categories: Cannot read the portsdb!
/usr/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/portsdb.rb:567:in `open_db’: database file error
….

The solution is pretty simple tp fix this error, enter:
# rm -f /usr/ports/INDEX*.db /var/db/pkg/pkgdb.db
# pkgdb -fu
# rm -rf /usr/ports
# portsnap fetch && portsnap extract && portsnap update

Next find out current portupgrade version:
# pkg_info | grep portupgrade
Sample output:

portupgrade-2.4.3_2,2 FreeBSD ports/packages administration and management tool s

# pkg_delete portupgrade-2.4.3_2,2
# cd /usr/ports/ports-mgmt/portupgrade && make clean && make install clean
# portupgrade -a

See /usr/ports/UPDATING file for more information.

SSH: Rotate backup shell script to remove directories (old backup files)

Posted on in Categories Backup, Data recovery, Howto, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Shell scripting, Sys admin, Tips, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated October 9, 2007

Most time you have a limited space on the remote SFTP/ SSH backup server. Here is the script that periodically cleanup old backup files from the server i.e it will remove old directories.

Requirements

Script will automatically calculate date from today’s date. By default it will keep only last 7 days backup on server. You can easily increase / decrease this limit. In order to run script you must meet the following criteria:

  • Remote SSH server with rm command execution permission
  • SSH Keys for password less login (see how to setup RSA / DSA keys for password less login)
  • Accurate date and time on local system (see how to synchronize clock using ntpdate ntp client)
  • Remote backup directory must be in dd-mm-yyyy or mm-dd-yyyy format. For example daily mysql backup should be stored in /mysql/mm-dd-yyyy format.

Sample Script Usage

Run the script as follows:
./rot.backup.sh 7 /mysql "rm -rf"
Where,

  • 7 : Remove last 7 days files
  • /mysql : Base directory to clean up. If todays date is 9/Oct/2007, it will remove last 7 days directory /mysql/02-10-2007, /mysql/01-10-2007, …. /mysql/26-09-2007, /mysql/25-09-2007. It means script will only keep last 7 days backup on remote sftp / ssh server.
  • rm -rf : Command to run on directory structure

Sample Shell Script

Install following script:

#!/bin/bash
if [ "$#" == "0" ];then
  echo "$0 upper-limit path {command}"
  exit 1
fi
### SSH Server setup ###
SSH_USER="vivek"
SSH_SERVER="nas.nixcraft.in"
START=7
DIR_FORMAT="%d-%m-%Y" # DD-MM-YYYY format
#DIR_FORMAT="%m-%d-%Y" #MM-DD-YYYY format
## do not edit below ##
LIMIT=$( expr $START + $1 )

## default CMD ##
CMD="ls"
SSH_PATH="."

[ "$3" != "" ] && CMD="$3" || :
[ "$2" != "" ] && SSH_PATH="$2" || :

DAYS=$(for d in $(seq $START $LIMIT);do date --date="$d days ago" +"${DIR_FORMAT}"; done)
for d in $DAYS
do
  ssh ${SSH_USER}@${SSH_SERVER} ${CMD} ${SSH_PATH}/$d
done

Run above script via cron tab (cronjob):
@daily /path/to/rot.ssh.script 7 "/html" "rm -rf"
@daily /path/to/rot.ssh.script 7 "/mysql" "rm -rf"

Fix corrupted RPM database on CentOS 5 / Redhat enterprise Linux 5 / Fedora 7

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Linux, Linux distribution, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Tip of the day last updated July 25, 2007

If rpm / yum command hangs during operations or you see error messages – it means your rpm database corrupted. /var/lib/rpm/ stores rpm database just delete the same and rebuild rpm database:

Command to rebuild rpm database

rm -f /var/lib/rpm/__db*
rpm --rebuilddb

Read rpm / yum man pages for more information

Uninstall files installed from a source code tar ball on Linux or Unix

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, File system, FreeBSD, GNU/Open source, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Solaris, Suse Linux, Tips, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX last updated December 24, 2005

Installing software from a source code is common practice in Linux and Unix world. Some time this is preferred method because it gives all power and flexibility you need to optimize your software such as MySQL, PHP, Apache and more. However, uninstalling files installed from a source code tar ball can be a big headache.

Two methods can be used to uninstall files:
Continue reading “Uninstall files installed from a source code tar ball on Linux or Unix”

Linux : How to delete file securely

Posted on in Categories File system, Gentoo Linux, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Security, Suse Linux, Sys admin, Tips, Ubuntu Linux last updated June 22, 2005

Recently we had lot of discussion regarding this issue. How to remove files securely so that it cannot be undeleted. Peter Gutmann paper “Secure Deletion of Data from Magnetic and Solid-State Memory” has very good information. Here are some commands/tools available under Debian GNU/Linux (it should work with other Linux distributions) to delete file securely.

srm: Securely remove files or directories

This command is a replacement for rm command. It works under Linux/BSD/UNIX-like OSes. It removes each specified file by overwriting, renaming, and truncating it before unlinking. This prevents other people from undelete or recovering any information about the file from the command line. Because it does lots of operation on file/directory for secure deletion, it also takes lot of time to remove it. Download srm from http://sourceforge.net/projects/srm (RPM file is also available for RPM based Linux distributions)

i) Untar and install the srm:

# ./configure
# make
# make install 

ii) How to use srm?
srm syntax is like rm command. Read man srm. Here is simple example:

$ srm privateinfo.doc

wipe: It is a secure file wiping utility

Download wipe from http://wipe.sourceforge.net/
i) Untar and install the wipe

# ./configure
# make
# make install

ii) How to use wipe?

$ wipe filename

Read man page of wipe for information.

shred: Delete a file securely, first overwriting it to hide its contents.

It is available on most of Linux distributions including Debian GNU/Linux. To remove file called personalinfo.tar.gz :

$ shred -n 200 -z -u  personalinfo.tar.gz

Where,

  • -n: Overwrite N (200) times instead of the default (25)
  • -z: Add a final overwrite with zeros to hide shreddin
  • -u: Truncate and remove file after overwriting

Read the man page of shred(1) for more information. Most of these utilities are not effective (read as useless) only if :

  • File system is log-structured or journaled filesystems, such as JFS, ReiserFS, XFS, Ext3 etc
  • Your filesystems is RAID-based, compressed filesystem etc
  • In addition, file system backups and remote mirrors may contain copies of the file that cannot be removed by these utilities.

See also: