Security Update: Debian Linux Kernel Local / Remote Vulnerabilities

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, kernel, Linux distribution, Security Alert last updated December 6, 2008

Debian project today released a pair of security updates to plug at least ten security holes in its core called Linux kernel. Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a denial of service or privilege escalation. This update has been rated as having important security impact.

How Install and setup a honeypot

Posted on in Categories FreeBSD, Linux, Monitoring, Networking, Security, Tips last updated March 20, 2008

Honeypot is a computer system set up as a trap for computer attackers. If intruders are always scanning the Internet for potential victims and they are can you find the intruders and their exploits by putting up fake networks that only a deliberate scan could find? That’s the theory behind honeypots. Peter Mikhalenko discusses the implementation, theory, and legality of using a honeypot to protect your network.

From the article:
A honeypot is solution. This is a system designed in such a way that an unsophisticated hacker will want to crack it immediately–like fake diamonds in a glass case in a jewelry shop. First, a quick story. A famous and rich man bought a super safe made of ferro-alloy. He boasted to everyone about his safe and claimed that nobody could crack it. After about a week of this, burglars came in the night and spent two hours cracking the safe with strong acid and explosives. When they opened the safe, they found nothing; the valuables were elsewhere and the burglars were caught.

A honeypot emulates a server with serious security holes. The intent is to attract network intruders so that they will spend their time on a useless job. Honeypots are closely-monitored network decoys that serve several purposes: they can distract adversaries from more valuable machines on a network, provide early warning about new attacks and exploitation trends, and allow in-depth examination of adversaries during and after exploitation.

Read more

How a Web server actually works ~ with C source code

Posted on in Categories Beyond nixCraft, C Programming, Howto, News, UNIX last updated January 9, 2008

Do you wonder how to write a program that accepts incoming messages with a network socket? Have you ever just wanted your own Web server to experiment and learn with?

Have you ever wondered how a Web server actually works? Experiment with nweb — a simple Web server with only 200 lines of C source code. In this article, Nigel Griffiths provides a copy of this Web server and includes the source code as well. You can see exactly what it can and can’t do.

Well, look no further — nweb is what you need. This is a simple Web server that has only 200 lines of C source code. It runs as a regular user and can’t run any server-side scripts or programs, so it can’t open up any special privileges or security holes.

This article covers:

  • What the nweb server program offers
  • Summary of C functions features in the program
  • Pseudo code to aid understanding of the flow of the code
  • Network socket system calls used and other system calls
  • How the client side operates
  • C source code

nweb only transmits the following types of files to the browser :

  • Static Web pages with extensions .html or .htm
  • Graphical images such as .gif, .png, .jgp, or .jpeg
  • Compressed binary files and archives such as .zip, .gz, and .tar
  • If your favorite static file type is not in this list, you can simply add it in the source code and recompile to allow it.

Read more at IBM developerworks

Mambo Security Problems

Posted on in Categories News last updated September 23, 2009

Hackers (read as cracker) attacking on unpatched versions of the Mambo content management system that can be used to build botnets for use in phishing scams and distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks.

They are using PHP-based CMS mass-exploitation and other vulnerabilities in open source CMS applications. If you are in server, collocation businesses then watch out all these attacks.

Update Mambo as soon as possible. More information available at following sites: