Linux HugeTLBfs: Improve MySQL Database Application Performance

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Hardware, High performance computing, Howto, MySQL, RedHat/Fedora Linux last updated May 20, 2009

Applications that perform a lot of memory accesses (several GBs) may obtain performance improvements by using large pages due to reduced Translation Lookaside Buffer (TLB) misses. HugeTLBfs is memory management feature offered in Linux kernel, which is valuable for applications that use a large virtual address space. It is especially useful for database applications such as MySQL, Oracle and others. Other server software(s) that uses the prefork or similar (e.g. Apache web server) model will also benefit.

The CPU’s Translation Lookaside Buffer (TLB) is a small cache used for storing virtual-to-physical mapping information. By using the TLB, a translation can be performed without referencing the in-memory page table entry that maps the virtual address. However, to keep translations as fast as possible, the TLB is usually small. It is not uncommon for large memory applications to exceed the mapping capacity of the TLB. Users can use the huge page support in Linux kernel by either using the mmap system call or standard SYSv shared memory system calls (shmget, shmat).

Linux find the memory used by a program / process using pmap command

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, FreeBSD, Gentoo Linux, Hardware, Howto, Linux, Monitoring, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Tips last updated November 20, 2007

You can find the memory used by a program (process) by looking into /proc directory or using standard command such as ps or top. However, you must calculate all memory usage by hand i.e. add Shared Memory + mapped file + total virtual memory size of the process + Resident Set Size + non-swapped physical memory used by process.

So how do you find the memory used by a process or program under Linux? Continue reading “Linux find the memory used by a program / process using pmap command”