Red Hat and Ubuntu Linux Top Enterprise Open-source Software

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop, News, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Save money with FOSS, Ubuntu Linux last updated February 11, 2008

Both distros top in 260 countries; From the report:

Ubuntu and Red Hat Linux are the most used Linux distributions among the 35,000 members of content-management vendor Alfresco’s community, the company found in its second survey of trends in enterprise open-source software usage. Alfresco collected data between July and December of last year, with survey participants coming from 260 countries, according to the company. Fifty percent were from Europe, the Middle East, and Asia, while 24 percent were in the U.S., and 26 percent from other nations, Alfresco said.

=> Red Hat, Ubuntu top vendor’s usage study

Dell Ubuntu Linux XPS M1330 Laptop Coming to Customers in Spain, UK, France and Germany

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop, Linux laptop, News last updated January 23, 2008

This is a good news for all European Linux users. You can now order Dell Laptop preloaded with Ubuntu Linux 7.10.

From the Dell blog:

Starting today, customers in Germany, United Kingdom, France and now Spain can purchase Ubuntu Linux 7.10 with built-in DVD playback on the XPS 1330n (in addition to the previously-released Inspiron 530n desktop system. For U.S. customers, you’ll have to hold on a week or so.

Ubuntu 7.10 runs great on the XPS M1330. It has more power, more style. Take a look at the Dell Ubuntu website for more details.

Ubuntu Tweak Software to Change Hidden Desktop Settings

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, Download of the day, Linux, Linux desktop, Linux laptop, Ubuntu Linux last updated January 10, 2008

Generally, I recommend using gconf-editor ~ a tool used for editing the GConf configuration database (Gnome settings). You can always edit configuration files. Many new Linux users find it difficult to use both gconf-editor and text files.

To make your life easier and to save time try out new Ubuntu Tweak software. It is designed to configure Ubuntu easily using GUI tools. It provided many useful Ubuntu desktop and system tweaking options such as:
=> View Basic System Information
=> GNOME Session Control
=> Show/Hide and Change Splash screen
=> Show/Hide desktop icons or Mounted Volumes
=> Show/Hide/Rename Computer, Home, Trash icon or Network icon
=> Tweak Metacity Window Manager’s Style and Behavior
=> Compiz Fusion settings, Screen Edge Settings, Window Effects Settings, Menu Effect Settins
=> GNOME Panel Settings
=> Nautilus Settings
=> Advanced Power Management Settings
=> System Security Settings and much more

Quick Installation

$ cd /tmp; wget http://ubuntu-tweak.googlecode.com/files/ubuntu-tweak_0.2.4-ubuntu2_all.deb
$ sudo dpkg -i ubuntu-tweak_0.2.4-ubuntu2_all.deb
$ ubuntu-tweak &

Ubuntu Tweak to Change Desktop Settings
(Fig. 01: Ubuntu Tweak in Action)

Bruce Byfield has published an interesting article on Linux.com:

For years, discerning Windows users have relied on Tweak UI, a semi-official Microsoft program for system settings not available on the default desktop. Now, in the same tradition and with something of the same name, Ubuntu Tweak (UT) offers the same advantage to Ubuntu users. Currently at version 0.2.4, for now UT is limited to features for GNOME and focuses mainly on changing default desktop and system behavior and how GNOME interacts with your hardware, but this small feature set is more than enough for proof of concept.

Download Ubuntu Tweak Software

=> Grab Ubuntu Tweak here (via Linux.com).

How to: Enable and Tag Files / Directories in Gnome Linux Desktop

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop, Ubuntu Linux last updated October 24, 2007

I’ve been looking for something like this. One brand new feature of gutsy is that tracker, a desktop indexer like google desktop, runs by default. Tracker also supports taxonomy for your files and folders but this feature is not yet integrated into gnome. But wait…you can have it anyway in a few simple steps

=> Howto: Enable Tagging in Ubuntu Gutsy in 4 simple steps

Ubuntu Linux install development / system library functions man pages (manual)

Posted on in Categories Debian Linux, Tip of the day, Troubleshooting, Ubuntu Linux last updated July 30, 2007

I am little surprised to find that Ubuntu Linux skips development man pages by default on cloud-based images. A quick search using apt-cache pointed out that I need to install the manpages-dev package on a Ubuntu Linux. It includes manual pages about using GNU/Linux for development. The manpages-posix-dev package includes manual pages about using a POSIX system for development. The man-db package is the on-line manual page i.e. actual man command to view man pages on a Ubuntu or Debian Linux.

Install development man pages on Ubuntu/Debian Linux

Type the following apt-get command to install various packages to view man pages for C standard library functions in Ubuntu or Debian system:
$ sudo apt-get install manpages-dev man-db manpages-posix-dev
Sample outputs:

Fig.01: Installing man pages on a Ubuntu or Debian Linux system
Fig.01: Installing man pages on a Ubuntu or Debian Linux system

How do I view man pages?

To view library calls (functions within program libraries), enter:
$ man 3 function-name
$ man 3 putc
$ man 3 strlen
$ man 3 printf
$ man 3 scanf
$ man 2 execve
$ man 2 fork

The number 3 or 2 indicates the section numbers of the manual as follows:

  • 2 : System calls (functions provided by the kernel)
  • 3 : Library calls (functions within program libraries)

See man page sections for more info:
$ man man

See also

nixCraft FAQ Roundup May 06, 2007

Posted on in Categories FAQ last updated May 6, 2007

Recently updated/posted Linux and UNIX FAQ (mostly useful to Linux/UNIX new administrators or users) :

Enjoy!

Howto create ringtones with Linux and open source software

Posted on in Categories Linux, Linux desktop, Ubuntu Linux last updated April 18, 2007

Have you ever wondered how to create mobile phones ringtones with open source software?

This guide will teach you howto create ringtones using Ubuntu and some Open-Source software:

Download and Install Audacity. The Audacity package specific to Ubuntu can be found at the Ubuntu Download Site. Alternatively you can type the following from your command line.

Since most cell phones use the MP3 codec, you’ll also need to install the LAME library separately (it doesn’t come with Audacity because of patent issues). The LAME library can be found at the LAME project site on Source Forge. Once you’ve downloaded LAME, install it with the following commands.

=> 3 Steps to Creating Ringtones with Ubuntu (link is no longer working, hence removed!)