Quagga: Linux Dynamic Routing Software

Posted on in Categories CentOS, Debian Linux, GNU/Open source, Howto, Linux, Networking last updated March 5, 2008

I’ve already written about Linux static routing configuration. However, sometime you need to configure Linux routers dynamically to get changes of network connections by communicating information about which networks each router can reach and how far away those networks are. These days most network admin prefer to use OSPF or BGP over RIP. Linux and UNIX system can act as router using special software.

Quagga Software

Quagga is a network routing suite providing implementations of OSPF (v2 & v3), RIP (v1, v2 & v3) and BGP (v4) for Unix-like platforms, particularly FreeBSD, Linux, Solaris and NetBSD. Quagga is a fork of GNU Zebra. Quagga is intended to be used as a Route Server and a Route Reflector. It is not a toolkit, it provides full routing power under a new architecture.

Zebra IP Routing Manager

zebra is an IP routing manager. It provides kernel routing table updates, interface lookups, and redistribution of routes between different routing protocols. zebra is included with quagga software.

Install quagga

Debian / Ubuntu Linux user type the following command:
$ sudo apt-get install quagga
RHEL , Fedora, CentOS Linux user type the following command:
# yum install quagga

quagga Software Configuration

quagga configuration is beyond the scope of this blog post; I recommend reading official configuration documentation for further information.

February 6, 2007 : nixCraft FAQ Roundup

Posted on in Categories FAQ last updated February 6, 2007

Recently updated/posted Linux and UNIX FAQ:

=> Shell command or script to write simple output on screen under Linux and UNIX

=> Delete a log files in Linux or UNIX

=> VSFTPD limit the number of simultaneous vsftpd connections for a single IP address

=> Gnome Desktop Keyboard Shortcut Keys

=> Disable Advanced power management (APM) on Linux

=> Locate files on linux, FreeBSD and UNIX system

=> List installed packages on Linux or FreeBSD / OpenBSD system

=> Howto: Use mysql or run mysql queries from shell script

=> Linux configure batch jobs using at command

=> Solaris add a new swap file for database

=> Apache server view performance status with mod_status configuration

=> Howto Secure portmap service using iptables and TCP Wrappers under Linux

How to mount remote windows partition (windows share) under Linux

Posted on in Categories CentOS, File system, Howto, Linux, RedHat/Fedora Linux, Suse Linux, Sys admin, Tip of the day, Ubuntu Linux, UNIX, Windows, Windows server last updated April 26, 2004

All files accessible in a Linux (and UNIX) system are arranged in one big tree, the file hierarchy, rooted at /. These files can be spread out over several devices. The mount command serves to attach the file system found on some device to the big file tree.

Use the mount command to mount remote windows partition or windows share under Linux as follows:

Procedure to mount remote windows partition (NAS share)

1) Make sure you have following information:
==> Windows username and password to access share name
==> Sharename (such as //server/share) or IP address
==> root level access on Linux

2) Login to Linux as a root user (or use su command)

3) Create the required mount point:
# mkdir -p /mnt/ntserver
4) Use the mount command as follows:
# mount -t cifs //ntserver/download -o username=vivek,password=myPassword /mnt/ntserver

Use following command if you are using Old version such as RHEL <=4 or Debian <= 3: # mount -t smbfs -o username=vivek,password=D1W4x9sw //ntserver/download /mnt/ntserver

5) Access Windows 2003/2000/NT share using cd and ls command:
# cd /mnt/ntserver; ls -l
Where,

  • -t smbfs : File system type to be mount (outdated, use cifs)
  • -t cifs : File system type to be mount
  • -o : are options passed to mount command, in this example I had passed two options. First argument is password (vivek) and second argument is password to connect remote windows box
  • //ntserver/download : Windows 2000/NT share name
  • /mnt/ntserver Linux mount point (to access share after mounting)

See also:

Updated for accuracy on Aug-8-2007, 8:19PM.